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SỞ GIÁO DỤC ĐÀO TẠO ÔN THI TỐT NGHIỆP TRUNG HỌC PHỔ THÔNG ĐỀ CHÍNH THỨC NĂM HỌC 2017- 2018 (Đề gồm có 04 trang) MÔN TIẾNG ANH ~ MÃ ĐỀ 385 Thời gian: 60 phút - không tính thời gian giao đề Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the word(s) OPPOSITE in meaning to the underlined word(s) in each of the following questions. Question 1: Our boss turned a deaf ear to our request to leave work early on Women’s Day. A. ignored B. rejected C. felt annoyed D. could not hear Question

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SỞ GIÁO DỤC ĐÀO TẠO                                       ÔN THI TỐT NGHIỆP TRUNG HỌC PHỔ THÔNG
      ĐỀ CHÍNH THỨC                                                                      NĂM HỌC 2017- 2018
    (Đề gồm có 04 trang)                                                            MÔN TIẾNG ANH  ~  MÃ ĐỀ 385
                                                                                        Thời gian: 60 phút - không tính thời gian giao đề
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the word(s) OPPOSITE in meaning to the underlined word(s) in each of the following questions.
Question 1: Our boss turned a deaf ear to our request to leave work early on Women’s Day.
A. ignored B. rejected C. felt annoyed D. could not hear
Question 2: He found it very hard teaching a class full of indifferent teenagers.
A. having no interest B. inattentive C. regardless D. similar
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the word whose underlined part differs from the other three in pronunciation in each of the following questions.
    Question 3:A. refrigerator B. pedestrian C. dictionary D. appreciate
    Question 4:A. delicious B. conspicuous C. concerned D. represent
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the co
ect answer to each of the following questions.
Question 5: The town......a decline after the mine closed.
A. fell at B. dropped at C. fell into D. dropped into
Question 6: The wetlands are......to a large variety of wildlife.
A. land B. home C. house D. accommodation
Question 7: Trees won't grow...........there is enough water.
A. when B. unless C. as D. if
Question 8: If you......to be chosen for the job, you'll have to be experienced in the field.
A. had wanted B. wanted C. want D. wants
Question 9: Industry in Britain has been......decline since the 1970s.
A. at B. on C. in D. for
Question 10: .......she agreed, you would have done it.
A. Should B. Had C. If D. Would
Question 11: She.......the greatest performance of her career.
A.
ought B. did C. gave D. provided
Question 12: If the doctor had a
ived sooner, the boy........
A. have been saved B. was saved C. might have been saved D. might be saved
Question 13: Do you think marks given by teachers are performance.......for students?
A. indicators B. levels C. marks D. ranks
Question 14: A man can never have too many ties. It's.......
A. unable B. incapable  C. improbable D. impossible
Question 15: The.......bird catches the worm.
A. initial B. first C. early D. prior
Question 16: He always did well at school........having his education disrupted by illness.
A. in addition to B. in spite of C. on account of D. even though
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the word(s) CLOSEST in meaning to the underlined word(s) in each of the following questions.
Question 17: I've just had to cough up £40 for a parking fine.
A. hand in B. produce unwillingly C. ask for D. sign a debt
Question 18: Feel free to help yourself to coffee.
A. Do as you want to B. Relax yourself C. Needn’t pay D. Don’t hesitate
Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the co
ect word or phrase that best fits each of the numbered blanks from 19 to 24.
   Despite our complex language skills, the face is still our primary means of communication. It is ...(19)... because our faces are so complex in appearance. that we can easily ...(20)... a friend in a crowd or attempt to check the trustworthiness of a stranger. ...(21)..., curability to recognise faces quickly. In all sorts of circumstances. is arguably our most important and remarkable visual skill. Thank.s to its very elastic skin. animated by a complex musculature capable of an enormous range of ...(22)... movements, the human face can quickly display a whole ...(23)... of contrasting emotions. As a result of evolution, we can read faces, making judgements about them ...(24)... on our experience. Without effort and without anything being said.
    Question 19:A. precisely B. pointedly C. Singularly D. uniquely
    Question 20:A. glimpse B. peek C. spot D. glance
    Question 21:A. Still B. Indeed C. Really  D. Anyway
    Question 22:A. insatiable B. intransigent C. invincible D. intricate
    Question 23:A. scope B. extent C. span D. a
ay
    Question 24:A. rooted B. based C. anchored D. derived
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the sentence that best combines each pair of sentences in the following questions.
Question 25: Ceylon had been independent for 24 years. Then its name was changed to Sri Lanka.

A. Ceylon had been independent for 24 years after its name was changed to Sri Lanka.
B. By the time Ceylon was independent for 24 years, its name had been changed to Sri Lanka.
C. After Ceylon had been independent for 24 years, its name was changed to Sri Lanka.
D. Ceylon was independent 24 years ago when its name was changed to Sri Lanka.
Question 26:  The president failed to explain the cause of the crisis. He did not offer any solutions.
        A. Although the president failed to explain the cause of the crisis, he did not offer any solutions. 
B. The president failed to explain the cause of the crisis, so he did not offer any solutions
C. The president failed to explain the cause of the crisis, because he did not offer any solutions.
D. The president failed to explain the cause of the crisis, nor did he offer any solutions.
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the underlined part that needs co
ection in each of the following questions.
Question 27: People who live in small towns often seem warmer and more friendly than people who live in populated densely areas.
A. small towns B. who C. seem D. populated densely
Question 28: Studying the science of logic is one way to cultivate one's reason skills.
A. science B. Studying C. reason D. way to
Question 29: This problem has proved difficult to solving because different countries have different laws on the copyright issue.
A. because B. difficult to solving C. different laws D. have
Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the co
ect answer to each of the questions from 30 to 35.
THE HISTORY OF NEWSPAPERS
   Newspapers can be traced back to 16th century Venice. In 1566, handwritten news sheets - called 'avisi' or ‘gazette' - filled with information on wars and politics in Europe were distributed weekly in Venice. Similar news sheets soon started to appear in other European countries. By 1615, Germany and Austria were publishing weeklies. And in 1621, the first news sheet appeared in England.
  At first, these news sheets only printed news which came from outside the country in which they were printed. Discussion of local or national issues was avoided. Europe’s governments did not tolerate anything negative being said about them as it could lead to national unrest.
  Such censorship slowed the development of nevwpapers. Nevertheless, a belief in the importance of a 'free press’ slowly began to take hold in Europe. England was among the first countries to escape government control of the press. This occuơed during the reign of King Charles I in the 17th century, when, during a period of
eakdown in the king's authority, people began to publish what they wanted.
  Eventually, frie press had the right to criticise government and voice other ideas freely. In the middle of the 18th century, Sweden became the first country to make press freedom a part of its law.
  In the 19th century, the newspaper industry was transformed by the invention of the telegraph. The telegraph was a communication system that allowed messages to be sent over long distances in a matter of minutes. It wasn’t long before newspapers became society's primary means of spreading and receiving information. In 1880, the first photographs appeared in newspapers and, by the end of the century, all the basic technical tools for the modem newspaper were in place.
  The story of newspapers in the 20th century was one of adaptation to changing consumer and media markets. The invention of radio, TV, and later the Internet, repeatedly drove newspapers to re-invent themselves. Also, during the 20th century, mass-market advertising increased profitability for newspapers. This attracted large, publicly-owned corporations who began buying newspapers from the descendants of cornpany founders.
   Over the years, people have periodically predicted the extinction of newspapers. In fact, every time a new media has come into being, dire predictions have been made for existing forms (e.g. television was supposed to have replaced radio, radio was supposed to have replaced newspapers). Yet history has repeatedly shown that new media do not replace existing media. Instead, what happens is that media consumption grows, which creates the necessary space for the new media to become a part of the media landscape.
   According to the World Association of Newspapers (WAN), each day more than 1.5 billion people around the world read a newspaper. The WAN has also estimated the total annual worth of the global newspaper industry and put it at just under 180 billion USD. Such statistics suggest the newspaper industry is healthier than at any other time in its history. Indeed, if the industry proves itself as capable of adapting to  change as it has done in the past, it is unlikely that newspapers will be disappearing  from newsstands anytime soon.
Question 30: In the 19th century,......
A. the newspaper industry invented the telegraph.
B. the role of newspapers became more important.
C. inform ation in newspapers became more technical.
D. photos signalled the start of the modern newspaper era.
Question 31: In paragraph 1, we learn that......
A. Europe was at war in 1566. B. news travelled slowly in Europe.
C. daily editions o f newspapers were a later development. D. newspapers get their name from 16th century news sheets,
Question 32: In the 20th century, newspapers......
A. used ads to attract investors. B. lost many readers to TV.

C. began to pass to public hands. D. Invented mass-market advertising.
Question 33: The extinction of newspapers......
A. would probably have occu
ed if radio had been more popular.
B. was originally predicted by the media itself.
C. is a prediction unsupported by past evidence.
D. would allow for more media to become part of the media landscape.
Question 34: The first news sheets......
A. were checked by authorities. B. were distributed internationally.
C. avoided all controversial topics. D. discussed foreign issues.
Question 35: In paragraph 3, we learn that......
A. criticising governments was the original purpose of a free press,
B. King Charles I opposed a free press.
C. England was the first to believe in a free press.
D. Sweden’s 'press freedom' law followed England’s.
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the word that differs from the other three in the position of primary stress in each of the following questions.
    Question 36:A. sew B. new C. stew D. nephew
    Question 37:A. stone B. bygone C. cyclone D. cone
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the sentence that is closest in meaning to each of the following questions.
Question 38: You can try as hard as you like but you won't succeed.
A. However hard you try, you won't succeed.
B. Although you won't succeed, you can try as hard as you like.
C. You won't succeed because you can't try as hard.
D. You can hardly try as you like, but you won't succeed.
Question 39: Refusal to give a
eath sample to the police could lead to your a
est.
A. If a
eath sample is not given, the police will refuse to a
est you.
B. The police could cause you to give a
eath sample to decide whether to a
est you or not.
C. If you refuse to be a
ested, you have to give a
eath sample.
D. You could be a
ested for not giving a
eath sample to the police.
Question 40: We won't be getting ma
ied until we have had enough money.
A. We will ma
y before we start to earn money.
B. We will ma
y when we have had enough money.
C. We won't ma
y even when we have had enough money.
D. We won't be ma
ied although we have enough money.
Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the co
ect answer to each of the questions from 41 to 48.
AGE AND CRIMINAL RESPONSIBILITY
   In countries around the wodd. a child must be above a certain age belore tfiey can be charged with a criminal oflence. This 'age of criminal responsibility', varies considerably. For example, in England, children are considered responsible for all illegal acts once they reach the age of 10. In Belgium, individuals are 18 before they reach the age of criminal responsibility. In the USA, it is up to a judge to decide whether or not a child can be held responsible for a crime.
   How is an 'age of criminal responsibility' decided? Well, roughly speaking, it is taken to be the age when a child knows the difference between right and wrong. Every country agrees that children are not capable of understanding the difference between right and wrong below a certain age. But they strongly disagree on what this age is.
   Pinpointing the age at which children have learnt the difference between right and wrong is difficult. For example, how old are children when they understand that somettiing is seriously wrong as opposed to simply naughty? Moreover, how old are children when they are able to understand the consequences of their actions? This is important because the law states that a person must understand the possible consequences of an action in order to be held responsible for it.
   In countries like England where the age of criminal responsibility is low, many people argue that it should be raised. They point out that it does not make sense to say that a child is mature enough to be put into an adult prison at the age of 10, but is not mature enough to drive, ma
y or vote for another 8 years. By contrast, people who want the age of criminal responsibifity to stay low say that raising the age would lead to higher levels of crime. They also argue that a low age of criminal responsibility makes children realise that committing a crime is a serious offence.
   Historically, one of the main reasons for introducing an age of criminal responsibility was that severe penalties were handed out for even the smallest of crimes. In medieval England, for instance, a person could be hanged for stealing a sheep. As children were also treated in the same harsh way as adults when they
oke the law, it was thought necessary to protect them from inappropriate punishments.
   Today, even in cou
tries with a low age of criminal responsibility, it is rare for a child to be tried in an adult court. What is more, a child found guilty of a crime will rarely be sent to an adult prison. Most countries have realised that if a child goes to an adult prison and mixes with adult criminals, not only will he be physically unsafe, but he will likely leave prison with an increased criminal knowledge. And the aim of most countries is to try to turn a child away from a life of crime.
Question 41: People who support a low age of criminal responsibility do so because......

A. the law isn’t taken seriously by children. B. children are responsible at a young age.
C. crime might increase if it is raised. D. children think comm itting a crime is funny.
Question 42: Today, most child criminals......
A. develop their criminal behaviour from adults.
B. can expect authorities to attempt to rehabilitate them.
C. can expect to be tried as adults in courts.
D. are typically not found guilty.
Question 43: In paragraph 2, what do we learn about the age of criminal responsibility?
A. It is meant to be the age when children know if what they do is right or wrong.
B. It causes a lot of fighting between countries.
C. It should be the same in every country.
D. It lets children know there is a difference between right and wrong.
Question 44: In countries where the age of criminal responsibility is low, ......
A. most people want it to be higher. B. adult prisons are full of children.
C. children mature faster. D. many people are happy it is low.
Question 45: In medieval England, .....
A. children faced the same punishments as adults. B. serious crimes were rare.
C. stealing animals was a common crime, D. child crime was a very big problem.
Question 46: Setting an age for criminal responsibility is hard because......
A. the law is very complicated. B. children are naturally naughty.
C. children cannot predict their actions. D. difficult questions must be answered.
Question 47: The phrasal ve
“handed out” is closest in meaning to......
A. jailed B. tied up C. distributed D. imprisoned
Question 48: In paragraph 1, we learn that.....
A. children are not prosecuted in the USA.
B. child crime is worse in England than in Belgium.
C. children cannot be charged w ith a crime.
D. a 10-year-old criminal will face different treatment in the UK than in Belgium.
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the sentence that best completes each of the following exchanges.
Question 49: ~ A: “................”   ~  B: “Yes, we all felt he’d let us down rather badly.”
A. Didn’t you feel annoyed with his lateness?
B. Were you disappointed that Graham missed the meeting?
C. Was Graham the last person to come to the meeting?
D. Did Graham turn up late last night?
Question 50: ~ A: "What is the most interesting part of your job?" ~  B: “................”
A. Not much. I've changed my jobs three times this year.
B. My job? I've never found more fun and new experience doing teamwork.
C. Boring? That's not when the boss's away.
D. Well, I spend most of my time swotting up for the next exam.
 
The End

SỞ GIÁO DỤC ĐÀO TẠO                                       ÔN THI TỐT NGHIỆP TRUNG HỌC PHỔ THÔNG
      ĐỀ CHÍNH THỨC                                                                      NĂM HỌC 2017- 2018
    (Đề gồm có 04 trang)                                                            MÔN TIẾNG ANH  ~  MÃ ĐỀ 736
                                                                                        Thời gian: 60 phút - không tính thời gian giao đề
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the word that differs from the other three in the position of primary stress in each of the following questions.
    Question 1:A. cone B. cyclone C. stone D. bygone
    Question 2:A. stew B. sew C. nephew D. new
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the word(s) OPPOSITE in meaning to the underlined word(s) in each of the following questions.
Question 3: He found it very hard teaching a class full of indifferent teenagers.
A. regardless B. inattentive C. having no interest D. similar
Question 4: Our boss turned a deaf ear to our request to leave work early on Women’s Day.
A. ignored B. felt annoyed C. could not hear D. rejected
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the sentence that best combines each pair of sentences in the following questions.
Question 5: Ceylon had been independent for 24 years. Then its name was changed to Sri Lanka.
A. After Ceylon had been independent for 24 years, its name was changed to Sri Lanka.
B. By the time Ceylon was independent for 24 years, its name had been changed to Sri Lanka.
C. Ceylon had been independent for 24 years after its name was changed to Sri Lanka.
D. Ceylon was independent 24 years ago when its name was changed to Sri Lanka.
Question 6:  The president failed to explain the cause of the crisis. He did not offer any solutions.
       A. Although the president failed to explain the cause of the crisis, he did not offer any solutions.  
B. The president failed to explain the cause of the crisis, because he did not offer any solutions.
C. The president failed to explain the cause of the crisis, nor did he offer any solutions.
D. The president failed to explain the cause of the crisis, so he did not offer any solutions
Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the co
ect word or phrase that best fits each of the numbered blanks from 07 to 12.
   Despite our complex language skills, the face is still our primary means of communication. It is ...(7)... because our faces are so complex in appearance. that we can easily ...(8)... a friend in a crowd or attempt to check the trustworthiness of a stranger. ...(9)..., curability to recognise faces quickly. In all sorts of circumstances. is arguably our most important and remarkable visual skill. Thank.s to its very elastic skin. animated by a complex musculature capable of an enormous range of ...(10)... movements, the human face can quickly display a whole ...(11)... of contrasting emotions. As a result of evolution, we can read faces, making judgements about them ...(12)... on our experience. Without effort and without anything being said.
    Question 7:A. precisely B. pointedly C. Singularly D. uniquely
    Question 8:A. glimpse B. peek C. spot D. glance
    Question 9:A. Indeed B. Anyway C. Really  D. Still
    Question 10:A. intransigent B. insatiable C. invincible D. intricate
    Question 11:A. span B. extent C. scope D. a
ay
    Question 12:A. rooted B. derived C. anchored D. based
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the word whose underlined part differs from the other three in pronunciation in each of the following questions.
    Question 13:A. represent B. conspicuous C. concerned D. delicious
    Question 14:A. dictionary B. pedestrian C. appreciate D. refrigerator
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the sentence that best completes each of the following exchanges.
Question 15: ~ A: "What is the most interesting part of your job?" ~  B: “................”
A. My job? I've never found more fun and new experience doing teamwork.
B. Boring? That's not when the boss's away.
C. Not much. I've changed my jobs three times this year.
D. Well, I spend most of my time swotting up for the next exam.
Question 16: ~ A: “................”   ~  B: “Yes, we all felt he’d let us down rather badly.”
A. Were you disappointed that Graham missed the meeting?
B. Did Graham turn up late last night?
C. Didn’t you feel annoyed with his lateness?
D. Was Graham the last person to come to the meeting?
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the word(s) CLOSEST in meaning to the underlined word(s) in each of the following questions.
Question 17: Feel free to help yourself to coffee.
A. Relax yourself B. Do as you want to C. Don’t hesitate D. Needn’t pay
Question 18: I've just had to cough up £40 for a parking fine.
A. hand in B. produce unwillingly C. ask for D. sign a debt

Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the co
ect answer to each of the questions from 19 to 24.
THE HISTORY OF NEWSPAPERS
   Newspapers can be traced back to 16th century Venice. In 1566, handwritten news sheets - called 'avisi' or ‘gazette' - filled with information on wars and politics in Europe were distributed weekly in Venice. Similar news sheets soon started to appear in other European countries. By 1615, Germany and Austria were publishing weeklies. And in 1621, the first news sheet appeared in England.
  At first, these news sheets only printed news which came from outside the country in which they were printed. Discussion of local or national issues was avoided. Europe’s governments did not tolerate anything negative being said about them as it could lead to national unrest.
  Such censorship slowed the development of nevwpapers. Nevertheless, a belief in the importance of a 'free press’ slowly began to take hold in Europe. England was among the first countries to escape government control of the press. This occuơed during the reign of King Charles I in the 17th century, when, during a period of
eakdown in the king's authority, people began to publish what they wanted.
  Eventually, frie press had the right to criticise government and voice other ideas freely. In the middle of the 18th century, Sweden became the first country to make press freedom a part of its law.
  In the 19th century, the newspaper industry was transformed by the invention of the telegraph. The telegraph was a communication system that allowed messages to be sent over long distances in a matter of minutes. It wasn’t long before newspapers became society's primary means of spreading and receiving information. In 1880, the first photographs appeared in newspapers and, by the end of the century, all the basic technical tools for the modem newspaper were in place.
  The story of newspapers in the 20th century was one of adaptation to changing consumer and media markets. The invention of radio, TV, and later the Internet, repeatedly drove newspapers to re-invent themselves. Also, during the 20th century, mass-market advertising increased profitability for newspapers. This attracted large, publicly-owned corporations who began buying newspapers from the descendants of cornpany founders.
   Over the years, people have periodically predicted the extinction of newspapers. In fact, every time a new media has come into being, dire predictions have been made for existing forms (e.g. television was supposed to have replaced radio, radio was supposed to have replaced newspapers). Yet history has repeatedly shown that new media do not replace existing media. Instead, what happens is that media consumption grows, which creates the necessary space for the new media to become a part of the media landscape.
   According to the World Association of Newspapers (WAN), each day more than 1.5 billion people around the world read a newspaper. The WAN has also estimated the total annual worth of the global newspaper industry and put it at just under 180 billion USD. Such statistics suggest the newspaper industry is healthier than at any other time in its history. Indeed, if the industry proves itself as capable of adapting to  change as it has done in the past, it is unlikely that newspapers will be disappearing  from newsstands anytime soon.
Question 19: The first news sheets......
A. avoided all controversial topics.     B. were distributed internationally.
C. were checked by authorities.     D. discussed foreign issues.
Question 20: In paragraph 1, we learn that......
A. news travelled slowly in Europe.     B. Europe was at war in 1566.
C. newspapers get their name from 16th century news sheets. D. daily editions o f newspapers were a later development.
Question 21: In paragraph 3, we learn that......
A. Sweden’s 'press freedom' law followed England’s.
B. England was the first to believe in a free press.
C. King Charles I opposed a free press.
D. criticising governments was the original purpose of a free press,
Question 22: In the 20th century, newspapers......
A. lost many readers to TV.     B. used ads to attract investors.
C. began to pass to public hands.     D. Invented mass-market advertising.
Question 23: In the 19th century,......
A. inform ation in newspapers became more technical.
B. the role of newspapers became more important.
C. the newspaper industry invented the telegraph.
D. photos signalled the start of the modern newspaper era.
Question 24: The extinction of newspapers......
A. would allow for more media to become part of the media landscape.
B. would probably have occu
ed if radio had been more popular.
C. was originally predicted by the media itself.
D. is a prediction unsupported by past evidence.
Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the co
ect answer to each of the questions from 25 to 32.
AGE AND CRIMINAL RESPONSIBILITY
   In countries around the wodd. a child must be above a certain age belore tfiey can be charged with a criminal oflence. This 'age of criminal responsibility', varies considerably. For example, in England, children are considered responsible for all illegal acts once they reach the age of 10. In Belgium, individuals are 18 before they reach the age of criminal responsibility. In the USA, it is up to a judge to decide whether or not a child can be held responsible for a crime.

   How is an 'age of criminal responsibility' decided? Well, roughly speaking, it is taken to be the age when a child knows the difference between right and wrong. Every country agrees that children are not capable of understanding the difference between right and wrong below a certain age. But they strongly disagree on what this age is.
   Pinpointing the age at which children have learnt the difference between right and wrong is difficult. For example, how old are children when they understand that somettiing is seriously wrong as opposed to simply naughty? Moreover, how old are children when they are able to understand the consequences of their actions? This is important because the law states that a person must understand the possible consequences of an action in order to be held responsible for it.
   In countries like England where the age of criminal responsibility is low, many people argue that it should be raised. They point out that it does not make sense to say that a child is mature enough to be put into an adult prison at the age of 10, but is not mature enough to drive, ma
y or vote for another 8 years. By contrast, people who want the age of criminal responsibifity to stay low say that raising the age would lead to higher levels of crime. They also argue that a low age of criminal responsibility makes children realise that committing a crime is a serious offence.
   Historically, one of the main reasons for introducing an age of criminal responsibility was that severe penalties were handed out for even the smallest of crimes. In medieval England, for instance, a person could be hanged for stealing a sheep. As children were also treated in the same harsh way as adults when they
oke the law, it was thought necessary to protect them from inappropriate punishments.
   Today, even in cou
tries with a low age of criminal responsibility, it is rare for a child to be tried in an adult court. What is more, a child found guilty of a crime will rarely be sent to an adult prison. Most countries have realised that if a child goes to an adult prison and mixes with adult criminals, not only will he be physically unsafe, but he will likely leave prison with an increased criminal knowledge. And the aim of most countries is to try to turn a child away from a life of crime.
Question 25: In paragraph 2, what do we learn about the age of criminal responsibility?
A. It lets children know there is a difference between right and wrong.
B. It causes a lot of fighting between countries.
C. It should be the same in every country.
D. It is meant to be the age when children know if what they do is right or wrong.
Question 26: Today, most child criminals......
A. develop their criminal behaviour from adults.
B. can expect authorities to attempt to rehabilitate them.
C. can expect to be tried as adults in courts.
D. are typically not found guilty.
Question 27: People who support a low age of criminal responsibility do so because......
A. children think comm itting a crime is funny. B. crime might increase if it is raised.
C. children are responsible at a young age. D. the law isn’t taken seriously by children.
Question 28: In medieval England, .....
A. children faced the same punishments as adults. B. child crime was a very big problem.
C. serious crimes were rare. D. stealing animals was a common crime,
Question 29: In paragraph 1, we learn that.....
A. children are not prosecuted in the USA.
B. a 10-year-old criminal will face different treatment in the UK than in Belgium.
C. children cannot be charged w ith a crime.
D. child crime is worse in England than in Belgium.
Question 30: Setting an age for criminal responsibility is hard because......
A. the law is very complicated. B. children are naturally naughty.
C. difficult questions must be answered. D. children cannot predict their actions.
Question 31: In countries where the age of criminal responsibility is low, ......
A. many people are happy it is low. B. children mature faster.
C. most people want it to be higher. D. adult prisons are full of children.
Question 32: The phrasal ve
“handed out” is closest in meaning to......
A. tied up B. jailed C. distributed D. imprisoned
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the underlined part that needs co
ection in each of the following questions.
Question 33: People who live in small towns often seem warmer and more friendly than people who live in populated densely areas.
A. small towns B. populated densely C. who D. seem
Question 34: Studying the science of logic is one way to cultivate one's reason skills.
A. science B. Studying C. way to D. reason
Question 35: This problem has proved difficult to solving because different countries have different laws on the copyright issue.
A. difficult to solving B. have C. different laws D. because
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the co
ect answer to each of the following questions.
Question 36: .......she agreed, you would have done it.

A. Should B. Had C. Would D. If
Question 37: Do you think marks given by teachers are performance.......for students?
A. marks B. indicators C. ranks D. levels
Question 38: If the doctor had a
ived sooner, the boy........
A. was saved B. might be saved C. might have been saved D. have been saved
Question 39: The wetlands are......to a large variety of wildlife.
A. house B. accommodation C. land D. home
Question 40: The town......a decline after the mine closed.
A. dropped at B. fell into C. dropped into D. fell at
Question 41: The.......bird catches the worm.
A. first B. prior C. early D. initial
Question 42: A man can never have too many ties. It's.......
A. improbable B. unable C. incapable  D. impossible
Question 43: Trees won't grow...........there is enough water.
A. unless B. if C. when D. as
Question 44: If you......to be chosen for the job, you'll have to be experienced in the field.
A. wanted B. want C. had wanted D. wants
Question 45: She.......the greatest performance of her career.
A.
ought B. gave C. provided D. did
Question 46: Industry in Britain has been......decline since the 1970s.
A. in B. at C. for D. on
Question 47: He always did well at school........having his education disrupted by illness.
A. on account of B. even though C. in addition to D. in spite of
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the sentence that is closest in meaning to each of the following questions.
Question 48: You can try as hard as you like but you won't succeed.
A. You won't succeed because you can't try as hard.
B. However hard you try, you won't succeed.
C. Although you won't succeed, you can try as hard as you like.
D. You can hardly try as you like, but you won't succeed.
Question 49: We won't be getting ma
ied until we have had enough money.
A. We will ma
y when we have had enough money.
B. We won't be ma
ied although we have enough money.
C. We will ma
y before we start to earn money.
D. We won't ma
y even when we have had enough money.
Question 50: Refusal to give a
eath sample to the police could lead to your a
est.
A. You could be a
ested for not giving a
eath sample to the police.
B. If a
eath sample is not given, the police will refuse to a
est you.
C. If you refuse to be a
ested, you have to give a
eath sample.
D. The police could cause you to give a
eath sample to decide whether to a
est you or not.
 
The End

SỞ GIÁO DỤC ĐÀO TẠO                                       ÔN THI TỐT NGHIỆP TRUNG HỌC PHỔ THÔNG
      ĐỀ CHÍNH THỨC                                                                      NĂM HỌC 2017- 2018
    (Đề gồm có 04 trang)                                                            MÔN TIẾNG ANH  ~  MÃ ĐỀ 273
                                                                                        Thời gian: 60 phút - không tính thời gian giao đề
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the word that differs from the other three in the position of primary stress in each of the following questions.
    Question 1:A. new B. stew C. sew D. nephew
    Question 2:A. cone B. stone C. cyclone D. bygone
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the word whose underlined part differs from the other three in pronunciation in each of the following questions.
    Question 3:A. pedestrian B. refrigerator C. appreciate D. dictionary
    Question 4:A. concerned B. represent C. delicious D. conspicuous
Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the co
ect answer to each of the questions from 05 to 12.
AGE AND CRIMINAL RESPONSIBILITY
   In countries around the wodd. a child must be above a certain age belore tfiey can be charged with a criminal oflence. This 'age of criminal responsibility', varies considerably. For example, in England, children are considered responsible for all illegal acts once they reach the age of 10. In Belgium, individuals are 18 before they reach the age of criminal responsibility. In the USA, it is up to a judge to decide whether or not a child can be held responsible for a crime.
   How is an 'age of criminal responsibility' decided? Well, roughly speaking, it is taken to be the age when a child knows the difference between right and wrong. Every country agrees that children are not capable of understanding the difference between right and wrong below a certain age. But they strongly disagree on what this age is.
   Pinpointing the age at which children have learnt the difference between right and wrong is difficult. For example, how old are children when they understand that somettiing is seriously wrong as opposed to simply naughty? Moreover, how old are children when they are able to understand the consequences of their actions? This is important because the law states that a person must understand the possible consequences of an action in order to be held responsible for it.
   In countries like England where the age of criminal responsibility is low, many people argue that it should be raised. They point out that it does not make sense to say that a child is mature enough to be put into an adult prison at the age of 10, but is not mature enough to drive, ma
y or vote for another 8 years. By contrast, people who want the age of criminal responsibifity to stay low say that raising the age would lead to higher levels of crime. They also argue that a low age of criminal responsibility makes children realise that committing a crime is a serious offence.
   Historically, one of the main reasons for introducing an age of criminal responsibility was that severe penalties were handed out for even the smallest of crimes. In medieval England, for instance, a person could be hanged for stealing a sheep. As children were also treated in the same harsh way as adults when they
oke the law, it was thought necessary to protect them from inappropriate punishments.
   Today, even in cou
tries with a low age of criminal responsibility, it is rare for a child to be tried in an adult court. What is more, a child found guilty of a crime will rarely be sent to an adult prison. Most countries have realised that if a child goes to an adult prison and mixes with adult criminals, not only will he be physically unsafe, but he will likely leave prison with an increased criminal knowledge. And the aim of most countries is to try to turn a child away from a life of crime.
Question 5: Setting an age for criminal responsibility is hard because......
A. difficult questions must be answered. B. children cannot predict their actions.
C. the law is very complicated. D. children are naturally naughty.
Question 6: The phrasal ve
“handed out” is closest in meaning to......
A. imprisoned B. distributed C. jailed D. tied up
Question 7: Today, most child criminals......
A. develop their criminal behaviour from adults.
B. can expect authorities to attempt to rehabilitate them.
C. can expect to be tried as adults in courts.
D. are typically not found guilty.
Question 8: In countries where the age of criminal responsibility is low, ......
A. many people are happy it is low. B. adult prisons are full of children.
C. most people want it to be higher. D. children mature faster.
Question 9: In paragraph 1, we learn that.....
A. a 10-year-old criminal will face different treatment in the UK than in Belgium.
B. child crime is worse in England than in Belgium.
C. children cannot be charged w ith a crime.
D. children are not prosecuted in the USA.
Question 10: In paragraph 2, what do we learn about the age of criminal responsibility?
A. It is meant to be the age when children know if what they do is right or wrong.
B. It lets children know there is a difference between right and wrong.
C. It should be the same in every country.
D. It causes a lot of fighting between countries.
Question 11: People who support a low age of criminal responsibility do so because......

A. crime might increase if it is raised. B. the law isn’t taken seriously by children.
C. children think comm itting a crime is funny. D. children are responsible at a young age.
Question 12: In medieval England, .....
A. serious crimes were rare. B. children faced the same punishments as adults.
C. stealing animals was a common crime, D. child crime was a very big problem.
Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the co
ect answer to each of the questions from 13 to 18.
THE HISTORY OF NEWSPAPERS
   Newspapers can be traced back to 16th century Venice. In 1566, handwritten news sheets - called 'avisi' or ‘gazette' - filled with information on wars and politics in Europe were distributed weekly in Venice. Similar news sheets soon started to appear in other European countries. By 1615, Germany and Austria were publishing weeklies. And in 1621, the first news sheet appeared in England.
  At first, these news sheets only printed news which came from outside the country in which they were printed. Discussion of local or national issues was avoided. Europe’s governments did not tolerate anything negative being said about them as it could lead to national unrest.
  Such censorship slowed the development of nevwpapers. Nevertheless, a belief in the importance of a 'free press’ slowly began to take hold in Europe. England was among the first countries to escape government control of the press. This occuơed during the reign of King Charles I in the 17th century, when, during a period of
eakdown in the king's authority, people began to publish what they wanted.
  Eventually, frie press had the right to criticise government and voice other ideas freely. In the middle of the 18th century, Sweden became the first country to make press freedom a part of its law.
  In the 19th century, the newspaper industry was transformed by the invention of the telegraph. The telegraph was a communication system that allowed messages to be sent over long distances in a matter of minutes. It wasn’t long before newspapers became society's primary means of spreading and receiving information. In 1880, the first photographs appeared in newspapers and, by the end of the century, all the basic technical tools for the modem newspaper were in place.
  The story of newspapers in the 20th century was one of adaptation to changing consumer and media markets. The invention of radio, TV, and later the Internet, repeatedly drove newspapers to re-invent themselves. Also, during the 20th century, mass-market advertising increased profitability for newspapers. This attracted large, publicly-owned corporations who began buying newspapers from the descendants of cornpany founders.
   Over the years, people have periodically predicted the extinction of newspapers. In fact, every time a new media has come into being, dire predictions have been made for existing forms (e.g. television was supposed to have replaced radio, radio was supposed to have replaced newspapers). Yet history has repeatedly shown that new media do not replace existing media. Instead, what happens is that media consumption grows, which creates the necessary space for the new media to become a part of the media landscape.
   According to the World Association of Newspapers (WAN), each day more than 1.5 billion people around the world read a newspaper. The WAN has also estimated the total annual worth of the global newspaper industry and put it at just under 180 billion USD. Such statistics suggest the newspaper industry is healthier than at any other time in its history. Indeed, if the industry proves itself as capable of adapting to  change as it has done in the past, it is unlikely that newspapers will be disappearing  from newsstands anytime soon.
Question 13: In the 19th century,......
A. inform ation in newspapers became more technical.
B. photos signalled the start of the modern newspaper era.
C. the newspaper industry invented the telegraph.
D. the role of newspapers became more important.
Question 14: In the 20th century, newspapers......
A. Invented mass-market advertising. B. used ads to attract investors.
C. began to pass to public hands. D. lost many readers to TV.
Question 15: In paragraph 3, we learn that......
A. England was the first to believe in a free press.
B. King Charles I opposed a free press.
C. criticising governments was the original purpose of a free press,
D. Sweden’s 'press freedom' law followed England’s.
Question 16: In paragraph 1, we learn that......
A. news travelled slowly in Europe. B. newspapers get their name from 16th century news sheets,
C. daily editions o f newspapers were a later development. D. Europe was at war in 1566.
Question 17: The extinction of newspapers......
A. is a prediction unsupported by past evidence.
B. would probably have occu
ed if radio had been more popular.
C. would allow for more media to become part of the media landscape.
D. was originally predicted by the media itself.
Question 18: The first news sheets......
A. were distributed internationally. B. avoided all controversial topics.
C. discussed foreign issues. D. were checked by authorities.

Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the word(s) OPPOSITE in meaning to the underlined word(s) in each of the following questions.
Question 19: Our boss turned a deaf ear to our request to leave work early on Women’s Day.
A. could not hear B. felt annoyed C. rejected D. ignored
Question 20: He found it very hard teaching a class full of indifferent teenagers.
A. regardless B. similar C. having no interest D. inattentive
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the sentence that best combines each pair of sentences in the following questions.
Question 21:  The president failed to explain the cause of the crisis. He did not offer any solutions.
A. The president failed to explain the cause of the crisis, because he did not offer any solutions.
B. The president failed to explain the cause of the crisis, nor did he offer any solutions.
C. The president failed to explain the cause of the crisis, so he did not offer any solutions
        D. Although the president failed to explain the cause of the crisis, he did not offer any solutions.  
Question 22: Ceylon had been independent for 24 years. Then its name was changed to Sri Lanka.
A. By the time Ceylon was independent for 24 years, its name had been changed to Sri Lanka.
B. Ceylon had been independent for 24 years after its name was changed to Sri Lanka.
C. After Ceylon had been independent for 24 years, its name was changed to Sri Lanka.
D. Ceylon was independent 24 years ago when its name was changed to Sri Lanka.
Read the following passage and mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the co
ect word or phrase that best fits each of the numbered blanks from 23 to 28.
   Despite our complex language skills, the face is still our primary means of communication. It is ...(23)... because our faces are so complex in appearance. that we can easily ...(24)... a friend in a crowd or attempt to check the trustworthiness of a stranger. ...(25)..., curability to recognise faces quickly. In all sorts of circumstances. is arguably our most important and remarkable visual skill. Thank.s to its very elastic skin. animated by a complex musculature capable of an enormous range of ...(26)... movements, the human face can quickly display a whole ...(27)... of contrasting emotions. As a result of evolution, we can read faces, making judgements about them ...(28)... on our experience. Without effort and without anything being said.
    Question 23:A. pointedly B. uniquely C. precisely D. Singularly
    Question 24:A. peek B. glimpse C. spot D. glance
    Question 25:A. Still B. Indeed C. Anyway D. Really
    Question 26:A. intricate B. intransigent C. insatiable D. invincible
    Question 27:A. extent B. a
ay C. span D. scope
    Question 28:A. based B. rooted C. derived D. anchored
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the underlined part that needs co
ection in each of the following questions.
Question 29: People who live in small towns often seem warmer and more friendly than people who live in populated densely areas.
A. who B. small towns C. seem D. populated densely
Question 30: Studying the science of logic is one way to cultivate one's reason skills.
A. Studying B. reason C. way to D. science
Question 31: This problem has proved difficult to solving because different countries have different laws on the copyright issue.
A. different laws B. have C. because D. difficult to solving
Mark the letter A, B, C, or D on your answer sheet to indicate the co
ect answer to each of the following questions.
Question 32: If the doctor had a
ived sooner, the boy........
A. might be saved B. was saved C. have been saved D. might have been saved
Question 33: The town......a decline after the mine closed.
A. fell into B. fell at C. dropped into D. dropped at
Question 34: The.......bird catches the worm.
A. early B. first C. initial D. prior
Question 35: The wetlands are......to a large variety of wildlife.
A. land B. accommodation C. house D. home
Question 36: Industry in Britain has been......decline since the 1970s.
A. in B. on C. at D. for
Question 37: Trees won't grow...........there is enough water.
A. when B. as C. if D. unless
Question 38: He always did well at school........having his education disrupted by illness.
A. even though B. in spite of C. in addition to D. on account of
Question 39: A man can never have too many ties. It's.......
A. incapable  B. improbable C. unable D. impossible
Question 40: Do you think marks given by teachers are performance.......for students?
A. levels B. marks C. indicators D. ranks
Question 41: If you......to be chosen for the job, you'll have to be experienced in the field.

Nguồn:Trường Cấn Chính

 
 
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