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Summer school  
Play the recording again. Draw the children’s attention to  
Lesson objectives  
To understand part of a prospectus about a summer  
school  
the target structures. Ask volunteers to find and read out a  
sentence with likes, then do the same for doesn’t like.  
To review and extend vocabulary for summer school  
activities  
Comprehension (page 5)  
2
Complete the sentences.  
To understand when to use capital letters  
To write a letter  
Do the example together, asking children to show you  
where to find the information in the text.  
If your class require more support, do the rest of the  
exercise orally, with pencils down.  
Language  
He/She likes (kayaking).  
He/She doesn’t like (painting).  
I like (doing pottery).  
Then children do the exercise individually. Let them check  
their answers in pairs before checking as a class.  
Kꢀy  
1
Yes, she does./No, he doesn’t.  
Alice is from the USA.  
She is eight years old.  
Vadim is from Russia.  
He is ten years old.  
Rada is from Russia too.  
She is nine years old.  
Rada is Vadim’s sister.  
Luis is from Brazil.  
New vocabulary: kayak, do pottery, trampoline,  
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
play table tennis, camp, cook outside  
Other vocabulary: play basketball, paint, do gymnastics,  
play football, tent  
More words: do jigsaws, make cakes, play frisbee,  
make models, collect stamps  
He is nine years old.  
Presentation and pre-reading (page 4)  
Ask the children to open their books at page 4. Draw their  
attention to the unit title and ask them what they think it  
means. See note below.  
3
Write likes or doesn’t like.  
The children use the reading text to help them to  
complete the sentences. Explain that they should use this  
activity to help them practise‘scan reading’(i.e. quickly  
looking through a text, searching for key words or ideas).  
They should not have to read through the whole text  
again or look for every sentence.  
Point to the pictures in the vocabulary panel at the top  
of the page, and explain that these are activities that you  
might do at a summer school. Say the words.  
Model the words again for the children and drill  
pronunciation. Then say the words in a different order and  
ask children to point at the right picture.  
Kꢀy  
1
6
doesn’t like 2 likes 3 doesn’t like 4 likes 5 likes  
doesn’t like 7 likes  
Explain that all the vocabulary words and phrases are  
verbs. Hold up your book and point to each picture in  
turn, asking What’s he/she doing? or What are they doing?  
Help the children to answer in the present continuous,  
e.g. She’s kayaking, and practise these sentences.  
4
Write Yes, he/she does. or No, he/she doesn’t.  
If necessary, ask some questions to practise the short  
answers as a class. Ask Does Vadim like kayaking? The  
children answer Yes, he does. Repeat with these questions:  
Does Rada like playing table tennis? (Yes, she does.) Does  
Vadim like playing football? (No, he doesn’t.) Does Alice like  
playing tennis? (No, she doesn’t.)  
Ask the children to look at the photos in the reading text  
and tell you what the children are doing (He’s kayaking.  
She’s trampolining. They’re camping.).  
Ask them for ideas about what kind of text it is. Explain  
that it is part of a prospectus from a summer school.  
The children look at Exercise 4 and ask and answer in pairs.  
Then they work individually to write the answers. Check  
the answers as a class, by asking volunteers to ask and  
answer the questions.  
Note In Britain, summer schools are available for children of  
all ages, starting from about six years old. Some children may  
come from other countries in order to study English. Other  
children go to a summer school to learn performing arts or  
sports, or to experience a range of outdoor activities.  
Kꢀy  
1
4
7
Yes, she does. 2 Yes, he does. 3 No, he doesn’t.  
Yes, she does. 5 Yes, he does. 6 Yes, he does.  
No, she doesn’t.  
Reading (page 4)  
1
Read and listen. $ 01  
Play the recording while the children follow the text in  
their books. Then say Point to Vadim/Alice/Rada/Luis. Ask  
some questions to check understanding, e.g. Does (Luis)  
like (playing basketball)? Where is (Rada) from?  
1
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 1 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
Kꢀy  
Vocabulary (page 6)  
1
Frank likes doing jigsaws.  
5
Read and write the letters.  
Tell the children to look at the picture. Read the sentences  
or ask volunteers to read them) while the children point  
2 Nina doesn’t like making cakes.  
3
4
5
6
Frank doesn’t like collecting stamps.  
Nina likes playing frisbee.  
Frank likes making models.  
(
to the appropriate people in the picture.  
Nina doesn’t like doing jigsaws.  
Point out the example answer. The children work  
individually to read the sentences and write the letters.  
Writing (page 7)  
The children compare answers in pairs before checking  
Ask the children to look quickly at the model text and tell  
you what kind of text they think it is (a letter). Ask them  
how they know this (it starts with Dear and ends with  
from).  
them as a class.  
Kꢀy  
1
h 2 a 3 d 4 e 5 b 6 c 7 g 8 f  
Read the text while the children follow it in their books.  
Ask some questions to check understanding, e.g. What is  
the boy’s name? Where’s he from? How old is he? Does he like  
playing table tennis/camping/painting?  
6
Look and write.  
First look at the pictures with the children. Make sure they  
understand that the children are thinking about activities  
that they like and don’t like; their faces show whether or  
not they like or don’t like them. Ask some questions to  
check understanding, e.g. Does Frank like trampolining?  
Does Nina like camping?  
8
Which words need capital letters? Correct the  
sentences.  
Look at the example together, and ask the children how  
many capital letters have been used. Ask them when we  
use capital letters (the most important times are at the  
beginning of a sentence, for people’s names, place names,  
days of the week, months; and the pronoun I is always  
written as a capital). If children can’t formulate the rules in  
L1, encourage them to look through the model text and  
find capital letters.  
Read the example answer and ask the children to help  
you complete the sentence (with the word camping).  
Make sure they understand that they need to use the -ing  
form of the verbs to complete the sentences.  
The children work individually to complete the sentences,  
then check their answers in pairs. Check the answers as a  
class.  
The children complete the exercise individually. Monitor  
the activity, making sure children are confident in their  
use of capitals.  
Kꢀy  
1
Nina likes playing basketball and camping.  
Frank likes camping and doing pottery.  
Nina doesn’t like playing football or playing table tennis.  
Frank doesn’t like trampolining or kayaking.  
Nina and Frank like camping.  
2
3
4
5
•ꢀ Check the answers as a class. For each sentence, ask Which  
words need capital letters?  
Kꢀy  
1
2
3
4
5
My name is Jerry and I’m from the USA.  
My friend’s birthday is in April.  
He’s seven and he’s from Egypt.  
I’m from Russia and my name is Anna.  
My birthday is in December and I’m nine.  
7
Write about ꢁou. What do ꢁou like doing?  
The children write a sentence that is true for them,  
starting with I like. Remind them to use the -ing form of  
the verb.  
More words (page 44)  
9
Write a letter to ꢀdward in ꢁour notebook.  
 In a stronger class, use the More words section to extend  
Answer his questions.  
the children’s vocabulary.  
Ask the children to look back at the model text and tell  
you the questions that Edward asks. See if they can find  
the phrase in the box in Exercise 9 that will help them to  
answer each question. Ask them how the letter should  
start (Dear Edward,).  
Ask the class to turn to page 44 and look at the pictures in  
the vocabulary panel. Model and drill the new words.  
When children are confident with the pronunciation,  
ask What’s he/she doing? about each of the pictures. The  
children answer He’s doing jigsaws, etc.  
•ꢀ The children write their letters. When they have finished,  
ask one or two volunteers to read them out to the class.  
The rest of the class listen, and then tell you whether they  
like or dislike any of the same things.  
Write.  
The children use the prompts to help them to write  
complete sentences. Do the first sentence with them as  
an example. Point out if necessary that the appropriate  
verbs are missing from the prompts.  
Writing (optional extension activity)  
Ask the children to imagine that they are going to a  
summer school, and to think of three or four activities that  
they are going to do there. Tell them to draw a picture of  
themselves, wearing or carrying all the things they will  
need in order to do their chosen activities.  
Let the children complete the exercise individually, and  
check their answers in pairs. Then check the answers as a  
class.  
2
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 1 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
 The children then write sentences with I’ve got… and  
because I like…, e.g.  
I’ve got a football because I like playing football.  
I’ve got a tent because I like camping.  
If you like, you can make this activity into a game. Put  
all the finished pieces of writing on tables around the  
classroom. Collect the children’s pictures and distribute  
them to different children. The children then walk around  
the class, reading the sentences on the tables, until they  
find the description that matches their picture. Let them  
do this in pairs. When both children in the pair have found  
their pictures, they sit down.  
3
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 1 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
Our things  
Let the children check their answers in pairs, then check  
them as a class by asking volunteers to read out the  
sentences.  
Lesson objectives  
To understand a simple cartoon story  
To learn or revise vocabulary for some personal  
possessions  
Kꢀy  
1
6
can 2 has 3 working 4 calculator 5 living room  
spaceship  
To use commas (for lists) and full stops  
To write a description of a room  
3
Write Yes, they have. or No, they haven’t.  
 Revise camera if necessary.  
Tell the children to look at the picture and ask and answer  
in pairs. They then work individually to write the answers.  
Language  
Can we borrow your (laptop), please?  
I’ve got (an Mp3 player).  
He’s/She’s/They’ve got (a camera).  
What’s he/she got?/What have they got?  
Yes, they have./No, they haven’t.  
Kꢀy  
1
4
Yes, they have. 2 No, they haven’t. 3 Yes, they have.  
No, they haven’t. 5 Yes, they have. 6 Yes, they have.  
New vocabulary: alarm clock, umbrella, suitcase, helmet,  
laptop, calculator  
4
Complete the sentences.  
Let the children work in pairs to complete the sentences,  
Other vocabulary: borrow, torch, spaceship, camera,  
CD player, Mp3 player, watch  
using the text to help them do so.  
Check the answers as a class.  
More words: purse, keys, lock, lamp, mirror  
Kꢀy  
1
3
torch; alarm clock 2 suitcase; umbrella; helmet  
laptop 4 calculator 5 spaceship  
Presentation and pre-reading (page 8)  
Ask the children to open their books at page 8. Draw  
their attention to the unit title and explain the meaning if  
necessary.  
Vocabulary (page 10)  
5
Write about ꢁou. Use I’ve got / I haven’t got.  
Point to the pictures in the vocabulary panel at the top of  
the page and say the words.  
•ꢀ Say Number one. What’s this? The children say A calculator.  
Repeat with the other items.  
Model the words again for the children and drill  
pronunciation. Then say the words in a different order and  
ask children to point at the right picture.  
•ꢀ The children write true sentences about themselves using  
I’ve got or I haven’t got.  
 Ask individual children Have you got an alarm clock? etc.  
They answer Yes, I have or No, I haven’t.  
•ꢀ Let volunteers take turns to read out a sentence about  
themselves.  
Ask the children to look at the story. Ask them to name  
the objects in the pictures.  
6
Look and write.  
Do the activity orally, with pencils down, before the  
children write anything. Choose volunteers to ask and  
answer the questions. Teach or revise CD player, Mp3 player  
and watch if necessary.  
Reading (page 8)  
1
Read and listen. $ 02  
The children then work individually to write the answers  
to the questions.  
Play the recording while the children follow the text  
in their books. Ask the children to tell you in L1 what  
happens in the story. Ask them to list the things that the  
twins borrow. Make sure they understand the meaning of  
borrow.  
Kꢀy  
1
He’s got an Mp3 player and an umbrella.  
She’s got a suitcase and a watch.  
He’s got a camera and a helmet.  
She’s got a laptop and a CD player.  
2
3
4
Play the recording again. Then put the children into  
groups of four and let them read the story like a play. (One  
child in each group can take the part of both twins, as  
they always speak together.)  
More words (page 44)  
 In a stronger class, use the More words section to extend  
Comprehension (page 9)  
the children’s vocabulary.  
Ask the class to turn to page 44 and look at the pictures in  
the vocabulary panel. Model and drill the new words.  
2
Choose and circle.  
The children read the sentences and circle the correct  
word or phrase in each one. Encourage them to use the  
text to help them.  
When children are confident with the pronunciation, let  
them ask and answer in pairs: Have you got a purse? etc.  
1
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 2 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
Match and write.  
•ꢀ The children write a short paragraph about their dream  
room, using the model text and Exercise 7 to help them.  
Monitor and help as necessary. If there is time, they should  
draw a picture of their dream room as well. You could  
display the drawings and writing texts on the wall.  
 Do the first word as an example. Say Look at the first ‘word’.  
There are many missing letters. Which word is this? Tell the  
children to look at the pictures and find something that  
begins with a t (torch). They draw a joining line between  
the picture of the torch and the first word. Then they write  
the missing letters on the dashes to spell out torch.  
Reading (optional extension activity)  
•ꢀ Before the lesson, write a description of a room (including  
the prepositions in, on, under and next to as appropriate),  
e.g.  
Let the children complete the exercise individually, and  
check their answers in pairs. Then check the answers as a  
class.  
In this bedroom, there is a blue bed with orange  
pillows. Next to the bed, there is a bookcase with  
lots of books. There is a green alarm clock on the  
bookcase. There are lots of pictures on the wall.  
There is a big table and two chairs. On the table,  
there is a computer and a CD player. There is a rug  
on the floor. It is blue and orange.  
Kꢀy  
1
torch 2 lock 3 purse 4 keys 5 mirror 6 lamp  
Writing (page 11)  
Ask the children to look at the picture next to the model  
text and ask What’s this? (a bedroom). See how many  
things they can name in the picture.  
Write the description on the board, or photocopy and  
distribute it, so that each child has a copy. The children  
then read the description and draw a picture of the room.  
Read the text while the children follow it in their books.  
Ask some questions to check understanding, e.g. What  
does Sally like? Has she got a DVD player?  
When the children have finished, let them compare their  
pictures.  
7
Write the punctuation marks, full stop (.) or  
comma (,).  
Write the following sentence on the board: My dream  
room is blue, purple, yellow, green and white. Ask the  
children to count the punctuation marks. Remind the  
children that we need a full stop at the end of the  
sentence. Then explain if necessary that we use commas  
to separate things in a list. Ask the children to count the  
colour adjectives. Point out that we don’t need to use  
a comma before the word and (although it would not  
actually be wrong to do so).  
Look at the example together, and ask the children how  
many items there are in this list (three), and how many  
commas (one).  
The children complete the exercise individually, then  
check their answers in pairs.  
Check the answers as a class. Ask the children to tell you  
which words should have commas after them.  
Kꢀy  
1
I’ve got a computer, a DVD player and a TV.  
I collect badges, stickers and shells.  
I love reading, writing and watching TV.  
My room is yellow, red and orange.  
I read comics, books and emails.  
2
3
4
5
8
Imagine ꢁour dream room. Draw and write about  
it in ꢁour notebook.  
Tell the children to draw a picture of their dream room.  
Explain that this means their ideal room, if they could  
have any room they wanted. They should think about the  
things they like doing, and make sure their room contains  
lots of things to do. They should also choose the colours  
and furniture carefully.  
Go around the class asking each child to say one sentence  
about their room. Prompt them if necessary by giving  
them the beginning of a sentence (see the prompts in the  
box in Exercise 8). Encourage more able children to say a  
sentence that includes a list of three or more items.  
2
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 2 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
A safe place  
one or two sentences in the text that tell them whether  
the sentence in the exercise is true or false (see answers  
below).  
Lesson objectives  
To understand a simple information leaflet  
To learn or revise vocabulary related to jungles  
To form and use present participles  
Kꢀy  
1
2
3
(The animals are not safe.)  
(They are safe here.)  
(Eighty orang-utans are living free in this park.)  
To write a diary entry about a day out  
Language  
4  (The rangers give them food.)  
He is (taking photos).  
5  (Visitors can go to the park to see the orang-utans.)  
6
(Rhinos and bears are not safe in the jungle. They are  
living free in Sepilok Park, too.)  
They are (cutting down trees).  
New vocabulary: jungle, cut down, orang-utan, ranger,  
visitors, rhino  
3
Choose and write.  
Other vocabulary: polluted, safe, dangerous, bears, holiday,  
giraffes, watermelon  
Let the children work in pairs to complete the text,  
choosing words from the box. Tell them to do the  
entire exercise orally before they write anything down.  
More words: binoculars, gorilla, hippo, chimpanzee, jeep  
(Alternatively, in a weaker class, you could do the exercise  
orally with the class.)  
Presentation and pre-reading (page 12)  
Check the answers by asking volunteers to read out  
sentences.  
Ask the children to open their books at page 12. Ask them  
to look at the pictures and tell you what they think the  
unit is about. Draw their attention to the unit title and  
explain what safe means if necessary. Elicit their ideas  
about why the unit is called that.  
Kꢀy  
1
6
jungle 2 beautiful 3 trees 4 dangerous 5 safe  
free 7 live 8 Visitors  
Point to the pictures in the vocabulary panel at the top of  
the page and say the words.  
4 Match the questions and the answers.  
Model the words again for the children and drill  
pronunciation. Then say the words in a different order and  
ask children to point at the right picture.  
•ꢀ Let the children work in pairs to complete the exercise,  
making sure they agree on all the answers before they  
write anything.  
Ask the children to look at the reading text. Explain that it  
is part of an information leaflet.  
•ꢀ Check the answers as a class.  
Kꢀy  
1
b
2 e 3 f 4 c 5 a 6 d  
Reading (page 12)  
Vocabulary (page 14)  
1
Read and listen. $ 03  
Play the recording while the children follow the text in  
their books. Explain the words polluted and dangerous if  
necessary. Ask some questions to check understanding,  
e.g. Which animals live in Sepilok Park? How many orang-  
utans are there? What are people doing in the jungle? Explain  
the meaning of free in this context (the animals can go  
where they like; they are not in cages).  
5
Complete the puzzle.  
The children write the words in the puzzle. (The words are  
all taken from the vocabulary panel on page 12.)  
Kꢀy  
1
2
v
c
3
4
r
u
t
j
i
Play the recording again.  
u
n
g
l
s
i
h
i
Comprehension (page 13)  
5
d
r
2
Read and tick () or cross ().  
6
o
r
a
n
g
e
r
n
-
u
t
o
r
a
n
o
Look at the example answer with the children, and help  
them to find a sentence in the text that tells us that this  
sentence is false (The animals are not safe.).  
w
n
e
The children read each sentence, decide whether it is true  
or false, and put a tick or cross as appropriate.  
s
Let the children check their answers in pairs, then check  
them as a class. For each sentence, ask the children to find  
1
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 3 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
6
Unscramble the words to complete the  
7 Choose and write the correct form of the verbs.  
sentences.  
•ꢀ Ask the children to look at Exercise 7. Explain that the  
children should choose a word from the box for each gap,  
but that the sentences describe what is happening now,  
so they need to use the present participle, or -ing form.  
This activity is quite challenging. Stronger pupils should  
manage once you use the example to explain how to  
‘unscramble’words. If you think your class need help, write  
the following words on the board before you start: safe,  
orang-utans, animals, jungle, rhino, visitors, cutting down,  
rangers.  
•ꢀ If necessary, remind the children how to form the present  
participle of a verb that ends in a silent e. Write the words  
write and take on the board, and ask the children to find  
the present participles of these verbs in the model text.  
Show them how the e has been removed from each verb.  
Look at the example answer with the children. Explain  
that they should unscramble the words, or change the  
order of the letters to spell a word they have learned in  
their reading text to complete this text. Alternatively, show  
them the unscrambled words on the board.  
•ꢀ Look at the example answer with the children. If you think  
they need more support, do one or two more examples  
with them.  
The children work individually to complete the text. Check  
their answers by asking volunteers to read out sentences.  
•ꢀ The children complete the exercise individually, then  
check their answers in pairs.  
Kꢀy  
Kꢀy  
1
6
animals 2 rhino 3 rangers 4 jungle 5 safe  
cutting down 7 visitors 8 orang-utans  
1 diving 2 eating 3 taking 4 playing 5 writing  
6 climbing 7 visiting 8 making  
8
Imagine a daꢁ out with ꢁour familꢁ. Write about  
More words (page 45)  
it in ꢁour notebook.  
 In a stronger class, use the More words section to extend  
Explain that the children are going to imagine they are  
having a day out with their family, and write what is  
happening.  
the children’s vocabulary.  
Ask the class to turn to page 45 and look at the pictures  
in the vocabulary panel. Model and drill the new words.  
Then say the words in a different order while the children  
point at the pictures.  
Ask the children to think of a place they would like to visit  
and to imagine that they are there. Ask Where are you? and  
let individual children answer the question (e.g. at the zoo,  
at a playground, at the beach).  
Read and tick () or cross ().  
The children put a tick or a cross as appropriate. This  
is quite tricky! Explain that they are expected to look  
carefully for differences between the three primates they  
have learned the words for (orang-utan, chimpanzee,  
gorilla).  
•ꢀ Do the same thing with the other questions in the box in  
Exercise 8, letting different children answer each time. Tell  
the children to listen carefully, as other people’s answers  
may help them to think of ideas for their own writing.  
The children write a short paragraph in the present  
continuous, describing what is happening on their day  
out.  
Kꢀy  
1
 2  3  4  5  6 ✘  
When they have finished their writing, they can draw a  
picture. Tell them to imagine that it is a photograph, taken  
at the moment that they are describing.  
Writing (page 15)  
Ask the children to look at the picture next to the model  
text and ask them what kind of picture it is meant to be (a  
photo). Ask What animals can you see? and revise the word  
giraffes if necessary.  
Vocabulary (optional extension activity)  
If the children have studied animal habitats, ask them  
to draw a picture of a habitat or ecosystem that they  
are familiar with (e.g. rainforest, desert, arctic, savannah),  
including some of the animals that live there. (If they are  
not very familiar with different animal habitats, you might  
want to do some research as a class.)  
Read the text while the children follow it in their books.  
Ask some questions to check understanding, e.g. Where is  
the park? What is Mum/Dad doing? What is the giraffe doing?  
Ask the children to find and read out present continuous  
sentences from the text. Ask them to tell you how the  
present continuous is formed (the correct form of the verb  
be + present participle). Identify the present participles  
used in the text.  
They then label the animals in their picture in English. You  
might want to make dictionaries available to them so that  
they can look up any vocabulary they don’t know.  
Ask them when the present continuous is used (when we  
describe what’s happening now).  
2
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 3 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
Life in space  
Kꢀy  
Lesson objectives  
1 Michael is an astronaut.  
2 The astronauts live in space for months.  
To understand a simple magazine feature  
To learn or revise vocabulary related to space  
To order present simple sentences  
3
4
5
They learn about the planets.  
Eating in space is funny.  
The astronauts write emails after work.  
To write about someone’s day using time phrases  
3
Read page 16. Put the pictures in order.  
Language  
He (gets up early).  
Let the children work in pairs, with pencils down, to  
re-read the text and decide on the order of the pictures.  
When they have done this orally, they number the  
pictures in order.  
They (live in space for months).  
New vocabulary: astronaut, planet, sleeping bag, float,  
telescope, space station  
•ꢀ Check the answers as a class. For each one, ask a volunteer  
to read out the sentence from the text that goes with the  
picture (see answers below).  
Other vocabulary: lie down, spacewalking  
More words: crater, satellite, land, take off, space suit  
Kꢀy  
1
2
3
4
5
6
d (The alarm clock rings early and the astronauts get up.)  
b (They get dressed and they have breakfast.)  
f (After breakfast they brush their teeth…)  
a (…and start work.)  
c (After work, the astronauts write emails or they exercise.)  
e (Then they have dinner and watch DVDs.)  
Presentation and pre-reading (page 16)  
With books closed, tell the children what the unit title is  
(Life in space), and explain the meaning if necessary. Ask  
them to tell you as many words as possible related to  
space travel. They will probably have to do most of this  
in L1, but encourage them to use as much English as  
possible.  
4
Match the two parts of the sentences.  
Ask the children to open their books at page 16. Point  
to the pictures in the vocabulary panel at the top of the  
page and say the words.  
Let the children work in pairs to complete the exercise,  
making sure they agree on all the answers before they  
write anything.  
Model the words again for the children and drill  
pronunciation. Then say the words in a different order and  
ask children to point at the right picture.  
Check the answers as a class.  
Kꢀy  
1
e 2 c 3 b 4 f 5 a 6 d  
Ask the children to look at the reading text. Explain that  
it is a feature in a magazine. Talk about the photos in L1:  
ask the children to tell you what they can see, and what is  
happening.  
Vocabulary (page 18)  
5
Read and tick () the correct sentence.  
The children read each pair of sentences, and tick the  
correct one. Look at the example answer with them  
before they start. Explain that sentences 1–3 are about  
the first picture, and sentences 4–6 are about the second  
picture.  
Reading (page 16)  
1
Read and listen. $ 04  
Play the recording while the children follow the text in  
their books. Explain the verb float if necessary.  
Check the answers as a class. Ask volunteers to read out  
the correct sentences.  
Ask some questions to check understanding, e.g. Where is  
Michael from? Where do the astronauts sleep? What happens  
when they eat? What do the astronauts do after work?  
Kꢀy  
Play the recording again. Ask the children if they have  
found out anything from the text that they didn’t know  
before, or that they found interesting.  
1 This astronaut is in space.  
2 He is using his telescope.  
3 He is looking at some planets.  
4
5
6
They are in the space station.  
He is exercising.  
She is floating.  
Comprehension (page 17)  
2
Correct one word in each sentence.  
Look at the example answer with the children. The  
children then use the text to help them to correct the  
remaining sentences.  
Let the children check their answers in pairs, then check  
them as a class.  
1
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 4 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
6
Complete the sentences.  
8
Imagine ꢁour hero’s daꢁ. Write about it in ꢁour  
The children complete each sentence with the correct  
notebook.  
word from the box.  
Tell the children to choose a‘hero’to write about. Explain  
that they are going to imagine their hero’s day and write  
about it.  
Check the answers as a class, asking volunteers to read out  
the sentences.  
Ask individual children What is your hero’s name? Where is  
he/she from? What is his/her job? If any of the children can’t  
think of a person to write about, make some suggestions,  
or prompt them by suggesting jobs (e.g. actor, writer,  
footballer).  
Kꢀy  
1
5
astronaut 2 space station 3 space 4 planets  
telescope  
More words (page 45)  
Ask individual children to make a sentence about their  
chosen hero using In the morning, In the afternoon or In the  
evening. Remind them that it doesn’t matter if they don’t  
know what their hero really does, they are just imagining.  
 In a stronger class, use the More words section to extend  
the children’s vocabulary.  
Ask the class to turn to page 45 and look at the pictures in  
the vocabulary panel. Say the words, and ask the children  
to tell you which of the words/phrases are verbs (land and  
take off). Show the meaning of these words if necessary by  
saying The spaceship is taking off (as you raise your hand)  
and The spaceship is landing (as you lower your hand  
again).  
The children write a short paragraph about their chosen  
hero, using the prompts in the box in Exercise 8.  
Vocabulary (optional extension activity)  
Tell the children to work in pairs to see how many English  
words they can think of that are related to space and  
space travel. Ask them to make a list. You might want to  
make dictionaries available for this task.  
Model and drill the new words. Then say the words in a  
different order while the children point at the pictures.  
Choose and circle.  
The children circle the correct word/phrase in each  
sentence.  
Kꢀy  
1
5
space suits 2 landing 3 craters 4 taking off  
satellites  
Writing (page 19)  
Ask the children to look at the photo next to the model  
text and ask them to tell you in L1 what they can see. If  
necessary, remind the children of the meaning of My hero.  
Read the text while the children follow it in their books.  
Make sure they understand that most of the text is  
fictional. Ask some questions to check understanding,  
e.g. Where is Lewis Hamilton from? What’s his job? What  
does he eat for breakfast? What does he do in the morning/  
afternoon? What does he do after dinner?  
Draw the children’s attention to the time phrases in the  
text: early in the morning, every day, in the morning, in the  
afternoon, in the evening. Explain that they are going to use  
similar time phrases in their own writing.  
7
Write the words in the correct order.  
Ask the children to look at Exercise 7. Explain that they  
have to write the words/phrases in the correct order.  
Remind them if necessary that each sentence should start  
with a capital letter and end with a full stop. Look at the  
example answer with them.  
The children complete the exercise individually, then  
check their answers in pairs.  
Check the answers as a class.  
Kꢀy  
1
My hero gets up at half past seven.  
First, he has a shower and brushes his teeth.  
Next, he gets dressed and brushes his hair.  
In the afternoon, he paints pictures.  
He dances and sings every day.  
2
3
4
5
2
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 4 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
At the museum  
Sleep-overs at museums have become popular in recent  
Lesson objectives  
years. Children take part in various activities during the  
evening, and enjoy the‘scary ’, but exciting experience of  
sleeping in the museum! Parents must always accompany  
the children.  
To understand an advertisement  
To learn or revise some adjectives  
To use a variety of time expressions  
To write about after school activities  
Comprehension (page 21)  
Language  
They always (want to come again).  
2
Look and write the times.  
Write the following digital times on the board: 5:00, 9:30.  
Point to each one and ask What time is this? Write the  
phrases half past and o’clock on the board.  
I sometimes (go swimming) on (Thursday).  
New vocabulary: dark, scary, amazing, boring, comfortable,  
exciting  
Look at the example answer with the children. See if they  
can find the sentence in the text that gives them the  
answer (The Big Night starts at 6.30 in the evening.). The  
children then use the text to help them to find the times  
for the remaining activities.  
Other vocabulary: sleep-over, torch, quiz, prizes, mask,  
sleeping bags, wake up, gallery, library  
More words: lonely, sleepy, grumpy, busy, uncomfortable  
Let the children check their answers in pairs, then check  
Presentation and pre-reading (page 20)  
them as a class.  
Ask the children to open their books at page 20, and point  
out the unit title. Ask children if they’ve visited a museum  
before and what they did there. Then ask the children to  
look at the photo within the reading text, without reading  
any of the text. Ask them what they can see, and elicit  
ideas about what the text might be about. Explain that it  
is an advertisement, perhaps in a magazine.  
Kꢀy  
1 half past six 2 seven o’clock 3 half past seven  
4 eight o’clock 5 nine o’clock 6 ten o’clock  
3
Read and tick () or cross ().  
Look at the example answer with the children, and help  
them to find the part of the text that tells us that this  
sentence is true (It’s dark in the museum at night. Is it scary?  
No.).  
Point to the pictures in the vocabulary panel at the top  
of the page and say the words. Explain the meanings if  
necessary. See if the children can tell you what kind of  
words they are (adjectives).  
The children read each sentence, decide whether it is true  
or false, and put a tick or cross as appropriate.  
Model the words again for the children and drill  
pronunciation. Then say the words in a different order and  
ask children to point at the right picture.  
Let the children check their answers in pairs, then check  
them as a class. For each sentence, ask the children to tell  
you where in the text they found the answer, and let them  
correct the false sentences.  
If you like, you could do a simple mime for each of the  
adjectives and let the children guess which one you are  
miming.  
Kꢀy  
1
(It’s dark in the museum at night. Is it scary? No.)  
Reading (page 20)  
2  (In the day you can visit the museum – and at night you  
can sleep there!)  
(7.00 Egypt quiz)  
(7.30 Dinner in the café in the museum)  
(10.00 Bedtime – get into your sleeping bags…)  
(Children always want to come again!)  
1
Read and listen. $ 05  
3
4
5
6
Play the recording while the children follow the text in  
their books. Explain the meaning of sleep-over. See Note  
below.  
Ask some questions to check understanding, e.g. What is  
the Big Night? What do the children need to bring? What do  
they do at eight o’clock? What time do they have breakfast?  
4
Match the questions and the answers.  
•ꢀ Let the children work in pairs to complete the exercise,  
making sure they agree on all the answers before they  
write anything.  
Play the recording again. Ask the children if they think  
they would enjoy taking part in the Big Night.  
Check the answers as a class.  
Note Sleep-overs are a popular weekend activity amongst  
young children in Britain. Children will invite a good friend  
to their home, usually for dinner and then to stay over  
night. Sometimes children, especially girls, choose to have a  
sleep-over party for their birthday: several friends bring their  
pyjamas and sleeping bags and stay for the night, eating  
party food and perhaps watching a DVD film or playing  
games.  
Kꢀy  
1 c 2 e 3 d 4 b 5 f 6 a  
1
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 5 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
Vocabulary (page 22)  
Choose and circle.  
The children circle the correct word/phrase in each  
sentence.  
5
Choose and write.  
The children look at the pictures and choose the  
appropriate adjective for each one. Tell them to look at  
the faces of the children in the pictures!  
Kꢀy  
1
5
busy 2 lonely 3 uncomfortable 4 grumpy  
comfortable 6 sleepy 7 amazing 8 grumpy  
Check the answers as a class.  
Kꢀy  
Writing (page 23)  
1
6
exciting 2 boring 3 scary 4 comfortable 5 dark  
amazing  
Ask the children to look at the photo next to the model  
text and ask them to tell you in L1 what they can see.  
What do they think the boy is doing? (He is doing pottery).  
6
Match.  
Read the text while the children follow it in their books.  
Ask some questions to check understanding, e.g. What  
is Sam’s favourite club? When is Reading Club? Where is  
Swimming Club?  
The children work individually or in pairs to match the  
sentences (or sentence halves), making sure that the  
completed answer makes sense.  
Check the answers as a class, asking volunteers to read  
out the complete sentence or pair of sentences for each  
one.  
Ask the children to find and read the sentences containing  
these adverbs of frequency: sometimes, never, always.  
Make sure the children understand what these adverbs  
mean, and draw their attention to their position within the  
sentence. Explain that they are going to use some of these  
adverbs of frequency in their own writing.  
Kꢀy  
1
They’re scary.  
There are comfortable sofas there.  
but my mum loves it.  
It’s got lots of swings.  
It’s too dark at night.  
2
3
4
5
6
8
Choose and write.  
•ꢀ Ask the children to look back at the text and find phrases  
that contain the prepositions in, on, at and to. As they read  
out the phrases, write them on the board, in four lists, like  
this:  
We can learn interesting things there.  
7
Choose and circle.  
Ask the children to look at the photo and read the  
caption, The London Eye. Give the children some  
information about this famous London landmark (see  
Note below).  
At our school  
in the library  
in winter  
at the sports centre  
at the swimming pool  
at four o’clock  
in the art room  
Let the children work in pairs to read the text and choose  
the correct words. Tell them to do this orally before they  
write anything.  
at half past three  
at five o’clock  
go to Music Club  
Check the answers as a class, asking volunteers to read  
out sentences.  
on Monday  
give them to my mum  
on Tuesday (etc)  
Kꢀy  
Look at the lists with the children and help them to  
formulate some basic rules for when each preposition is  
used. The rules are complicated, so only attempt to do this  
in very basic terms. (Note that we usually use at for places,  
but in for rooms. The preposition to usually indicates  
direction.)  
1
scary 2 amazing 3 interesting 4 exciting 5 dark  
Note The London Eye is a big wheel that was built in the  
centre of London to commemorate the new millennium. It  
opened in March 2000, and quickly became the UK’s most  
visited paid-for tourist attraction, with around 3.5 million  
visitors per year. People enter one of the‘capsules’or small  
compartments made of glass and steel – about 25 people fit  
into a capsule. Then, the wheel rotates around, taking about  
•ꢀ The children complete the exercise individually, using the  
lists on the board to help them if necessary. Then let them  
check their answers in pairs.  
3
0 minutes to complete the cycle. The views from the top  
of the wheel are fantastic: on a clear day, you can see up to  
0 km in all directions.  
Check the answers as a class.  
Kꢀy  
1
4
in 2 on 3 at 4 to 5 in 6 on 7 At  
More words (page 46)  
9
Write in ꢁour notebook about ꢁour activities  
 In a stronger class, use the More words section to extend  
after school.  
the children’s vocabulary.  
Write these time phrases on the board: sometimes, always,  
Ask the class to turn to page 46 and look at the pictures  
in the vocabulary panel. Say the words, and explain their  
meanings.  
every day, on Monday.  
Ask individual children What do you do after school?  
Encourage each child to answer with one full sentence,  
containing one of the time expressions (changing the day  
of the week as necessary), e.g. I do my homework every day,  
I go to swimming lessons on Thursday, I sometimes watch TV,  
I always read comics) and help them with any vocabulary.  
Model and drill the new adjectives. Then say the words in  
a different order while the children point at the pictures.  
2
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 5 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
Tell the children to write about two or three after school  
activities, using the language in the box in Exercise 9.  
Encourage them to use the model text and Exercise 8 to  
help them too. They should start by naming the activity,  
then add information about it, e.g.  
On Tuesday I always go to Football Club. It’s at the  
sports centre at four o’clock.  
My favourite activity is Art Club. It’s on Monday at half  
past five. I sometimes do pottery at Art Club.  
Monitor and help as necessary. When the children have  
finished, let volunteers read out their finished texts.  
Writing (optional extension activity)  
Before the lesson, think of some important landmarks and  
tourist destinations in your country (e.g. tall buildings or  
statues, museums, theme parks).  
Look again at the text about the London Eye on page 22.  
Ask the children to tell you the names of some famous  
landmarks/places in your country. Elicit some facts about  
each one, and make notes on the board. Add some  
information yourself.  
Tell the children to choose one of the landmarks and  
to write a short paragraph about it. Encourage them to  
include the structure You can…, as in the text about the  
London Eye.  
3
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 5 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
Australia  
Comprehension (page 25)  
Lesson objectives  
To understand a factual text about a country  
To learn or revise some vocabulary relating to Australia  
To use capital letters for proper nouns  
To write about their country  
2 Choose and circle.  
•ꢀ The children use the text to help them choose the correct  
word in each sentence. Look at the example answer with  
them before they start. Revise the words waterfall and lake  
if necessary.  
Let the children check their answers in pairs, then check  
them as a class. Ask the children to tell you the parts of the  
text that told them the answers.  
Language  
the biggest (city)  
the highest (mountain)  
the longest (river)  
Kꢀy  
1
6
coast 2 island 3 mountain 4 desert 5 kangaroos  
biggest  
the tallest (building)  
New vocabulary: island, coast, city, desert, koala, emu  
Other vocabulary: country, bridge, mountain, river, lake,  
ocean, building, space, kangaroo, crocodile, snake  
3 Correct the sentences.  
•ꢀ Look at the example answer with the children, and help  
them to find the part of the text that gives us the answer.  
Explain that each sentence has one wrong word. Teach or  
revise the word ocean if necessary.  
More words: cliff, valley, volcano, cave, canal  
Presentation and pre-reading (page 24)  
The children read each sentence, decide which word is  
wrong, and write the correct sentence underneath.  
Ask the children to tell you in L1 what they know about  
Australia. Prompt them if necessary by asking questions,  
e.g. Where is it? What is it like? What special animals live  
there?  
Let the children check their answers in pairs, then check  
them as a class. For each sentence, ask the children to tell  
you which part of the text gave them the answer.  
Tell the children to open their books at page 24. Point to  
the pictures in the vocabulary panel at the top of the page  
and say the words. Explain the meanings if necessary.  
Kꢀy  
1 Crocodiles and snakes are dangerous animals.  
2
3
4
5
Australia is the biggest island in the world.  
The highest mountain in Australia is Mount Kosciuszko.  
The Great Victoria is a big desert.  
You might like to draw a very simple outline map of your  
country. Point and say This is the coast. These are cities (and  
say their names). This is an island.  
There is a big bridge in Sydney.  
Model the words again for the children and drill  
pronunciation. Then say the words in a different order and  
ask children to point at the right picture.  
4
Answer the questions.  
Let the children work in pairs to complete the exercise,  
making sure they agree on all the answers before they  
write anything. Explain that they don’t need to answer in  
full sentences.  
Reading (page 24)  
1
Read and listen. $ 06  
Check the answers as a class.  
Write the following words on the board: coast, mountain,  
river, desert, space, sea. Ask the children to scan quickly  
through the text and tell you which of these things they  
are going to read about.  
Kꢀy  
1
2
Mount Kosciuszko  
surfing and going to the beach  
Play the recording while the children follow the text in  
their books.  
3 Sydney  
4 crocodiles and snakes  
5 a desert / the biggest desert in Australia  
6 three metres  
7 Oz  
Ask some questions to check understanding, e.g. What  
language do Australians speak? What is the biggest city  
called? What can you do on Mount Kosciuszko in winter? Can  
emus fly?  
8 yes  
Play the recording again. Ask the children to find the  
superlatives in the text. Revise these if necessary or give a  
few examples to start them off (biggest island, biggest city,  
highest mountain, biggest desert).  
1
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 6 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
Model and drill the new words. Then say the words in a  
different order while the children point at the pictures.  
Vocabulary (page 26)  
5
Find and circle. Write.  
Circle four words and write.  
The children find and circle the words in the grid and  
Explain that the children have to find four words in each  
line and circle them, then write the words on the line, with  
commas between them. Note that words from pages 24  
to 26 are included.  
write them next to the appropriate pictures.  
Kꢀy  
1
emu 2 desert 3 coast 4 city 5 island 6 koala  
Kꢀy  
a
s
t
c
i
s
l
t
t
y
a
e
a
l
1
cave, cliff, valley, canal  
volcano, cliff, desert, valley  
island, cave, volcano, canal  
cave, cliff, valley, coast  
canal, desert, city, cave  
desert, cliff, island, valley  
2
3
4
5
6
c
d o n  
o e m u  
k
l
a
s
t
s
e
r
t
k o a  
Writing (page 27)  
Ask the children to look at the photo next to the model  
text and ask them to tell you in L1 what they can see.  
I
t
n
e
Read the text while the children follow it in their books.  
Ask some questions to check understanding, e.g. What is  
the biggest city / longest river / highest mountain in the USA?  
a m d y o  
Ask the children to find and read the sentences  
containing superlatives. Explain that they are going to use  
superlatives in their own writing.  
s
y
e
r
j
v
6
Circle the odd-one-out.  
8
Complete the table. Write the proper nouns with  
Look at the example answer with the children and see  
if they can explain in L1 why emu is the odd-one-out.  
Explain that odd-one-out refers to the one word which  
belongs to a different category or group, so here emu is  
the odd-one-out because it isn’t a geographical feature, or  
because it is the only animal.  
capital letters.  
Ask the children to look back at the text and find the  
words that begin with a capital letter (not including  
words at the beginning of sentences). Remind them that  
proper nouns (names of people, countries, cities, rivers,  
etc) always begin with capital letters. (Point out that all  
the letters in USA are capitals because these are initials,  
standing for the United States of America. Note also that  
for names of rivers, we usually include the, but without a  
capital T, e.g. the Mississippi, the Amazon, the Thames.)  
The children work individually or in pairs to find the word  
in each row that doesn’t belong to the same category as  
the others.  
Check the answers as a class, asking volunteers to explain  
in L1 why each word is the odd-one-out. Accept any  
answers that the children can explain!  
Tell the children to write each word from the box in the  
correct place in the table, changing lower case letters to  
capitals as appropriate. Monitor and help as necessary.  
Kꢀy  
1
2
3
4
5
emu (because it isn’t a geographical feature)  
island (because it isn’t an animal)  
river (because it isn’t man-made, or it’s a natural feature)  
crocodile (because it isn’t a geographical feature)  
Sydney (because it isn’t a continent)  
Let the children check their answers in pairs, then check  
them as a class by reading each line of the table in turn,  
and asking the children which words should begin with a  
capital letter.  
Kꢀy  
7
Choose and write.  
Noun  
Proper noun  
Egypt  
Let the children work in pairs to read the text and choose  
the correct words. Tell them to do this orally before they  
write anything.  
country  
city  
New York  
Check the answers as a class, asking volunteers to read out  
sentences.  
lake  
Lake Baikal  
Mount Everest  
the Nile  
Kꢀy  
1
mountain  
river  
island 2 coast 3 desert 4 emu 5 koala 6 city  
More words (page 46)  
ocean  
Pacific Ocean  
 In a stronger class, use the More words section to extend  
the children’s vocabulary.  
Ask the class to turn to page 46 and look at the pictures in  
the panel. Say the words, and explain their meanings.  
2
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 6 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
9
Complete the fact file about ꢁour countrꢁ. Write  
sentences about ꢁour countrꢁ in ꢁour notebook.  
Help the children to complete the table. Ask What’s the  
biggest city) in (your country)? and see if the children can  
(
answer the questions. Tell them the answers if necessary,  
and write the words on the board if they are difficult to  
spell.  
Tell the children to use the table to help them to write  
sentences about their country. Encourage them to use the  
model text to help them too. You might want to do one or  
two examples with them before they start. With a weaker  
class, do the whole activity orally before the children write  
anything.  
Vocabulary (optional extension activity)  
Draw the following table on the board:  
Country  
Adjective  
Australia  
England  
Australian  
English  
Ask the children to help you add more examples to the  
table. Remind them if necessary that we always use capital  
letters for both the country names and the nationality  
adjectives.  
Tell the children to copy the table. Then let them work in  
pairs to see how many more examples they can add. You  
might want to make dictionaries available for this activity.  
Check the children’s knowledge of country names and  
nationality adjectives by saying I’m (French). I live in… or  
I live in (Scotland). I’m… and letting the children finish the  
sentence.  
3
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 6 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
Let’s play ‘Boatman’!  
Comprehension (page 29)  
Lesson objectives  
To understand a text explaining the rules of a game  
2 Choose and write.  
To learn or revise some prepositions (and verbs)  
To use the conjunctions (linkers) and and or  
To write about their favourite game  
•ꢀ This exercise is quite challenging; the children will manage  
it more easily if they have some experience of playing the  
Boatman’game.  
Let the children work in pairs, completing the whole  
exercise orally before they write anything. Encourage  
them to look back at the text to help them.  
Language  
You must (run).  
Check the answers as a class.  
You mustn’t (walk).  
Kꢀy  
New vocabulary: at the side of, in front of, across, past,  
From left to right:  
beside, in the middle of  
I’m the Boatman. Can we go across the river?  
You can go across, if you’re wearing blue. We can walk.  
I must run. Now you must help me.  
Other vocabulary: playground, stand, stay, catch, choose  
More words: skip, hop, crawl, swing, hide  
3
Correct one word in each sentence.  
Presentation and pre-reading (page 28)  
The children need to look carefully at the reading text in  
Tell the children they are going to learn how to play a  
game. Ask them to open their books at page 28 and  
to look at the pictures within the reading text. Without  
reading any of the text, can they tell you anything (in L1)  
about the game? (e.g. it is played by a group of children  
in the playground, and they start at the side of the  
playground).  
order to identify the word that is wrong.  
•ꢀ Check the answers as a class by asking volunteers to read  
out the correct sentences.  
Kꢀy  
1
2
3
4
5
The Boatman stands in front of the other children.  
The children say, ‘Boatman, can we go across the river?’  
The Boatman chooses a colour.  
Some of the children can walk.  
The Boatman tries to catch the children.  
Point to the pictures in the vocabulary panel at the top  
of the page and say the words. Explain the meanings if  
necessary.  
Model the words again for the children and drill  
pronunciation.  
4 Write must or mustn’t.  
Say complete sentences describing the pictures, but in  
a different order, and ask children to point at the right  
picture, e.g. She’s running past the tree. She’s in the middle of  
the square. He’s at the side of the square. He’s beside the girl.  
He’s in front of the school. He’s running across the square.  
•ꢀ Let the children work in pairs to complete the exercise,  
making sure they agree on all the answers before they  
write anything.  
•ꢀ Check the answers as a class.  
Kꢀy  
1
Give the children some instructions to follow, e.g. Stand  
beside your desk. Put your pencil in the middle of your desk.  
Stand in front of your desk. Walk past the board. Stand at the  
side of the classroom. Walk across the classroom.  
must 2 must 3 mustn’t; must 4 must 5 must  
Vocabulary (page 30)  
5
Choose and write.  
Reading (page 28)  
Ask the children to look at the picture in Exercise 5. Hold  
up your book and point to each of the children (or groups  
of children) in turn. Ask What’s he/she doing? or What  
are they doing? Tell the children to look in the box at the  
top of the page, and let volunteers answer you with full  
sentences, e.g. She’s trampolining, They’re doing gymnastics.  
1
Read and listen. $ 07  
Play the recording while the children follow the text in  
their books. Then ask the children to tell you in L1 what  
they understand of the rules.  
Play the recording again, this time pausing the CD where  
appropriate as you set up and demonstrate the game in  
the classroom, using a few volunteers (do this at walking  
pace, as a demonstration only).  
 Ask Who is shouting? (the boy who is running). Revise the  
word shouting if necessary.  
The children read and complete the sentences, choosing  
the correct words from the box.  
Play the recording again.  
Kꢀy  
1
4
If you have enough space, and time to do so, play the  
game as a class making sure to use English only. If  
possible, take the class outside to play!  
playing basketball 2 trampolining 3 reading a comic  
shouting 5 doing gymnastics 6 running  
1
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 7 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
6
Where’s the elephant? Look and write.  
8 Write in ꢁour notebook about ꢁour favourite  
game.  
•ꢀ Ask the children What’s your favourite game? and elicit  
several different answers.  
The children complete the sentences using the correct  
prepositions from the box.  
Kꢀy  
1
5
Choose a confident child and ask him/her the rest of  
the questions in the box in Exercise 8. Help him/her to  
formulate answers using complete sentences.  
at the side of 2 across 3 past 4 in the middle of  
beside 6 in front of  
Repeat with one or two more volunteers. Then tell the  
children to write a short paragraph about their favourite  
game. Make sure they understand that they shouldn’t  
write questions and answers; the questions in the box are  
there just to prompt them.  
More words (page 47)  
 In a stronger class, use the More words section to extend  
the children’s vocabulary.  
Ask the class to turn to page 47 and look at the pictures  
in the vocabulary panel. Say the words, and explain their  
meanings if necessary.  
When the children have finished writing, invite a volunteer  
to read out his/her text, omitting the name of the game.  
The rest of the class must guess the game. Make sure  
before you start that the game is one that is likely to be  
known by the rest of the class!  
Model and drill the new words. Then say the words in a  
different order while the children point at the pictures.  
Do a simple mime for each of the verbs, and let the  
children say the words. Then say the words without doing  
the mimes, and let the children do the mimes.  
Writing (optional extension activity)  
Use this activity to practise the present continuous and  
prepositions.  
Answer Yes, he/she is. or No, he/she isn’t.  
The children answer the questions by writing the correct  
short answer. More able children can add a sentence after  
each negative answer.  
Look again at Exercise 5 on page 30. Ask the children to  
draw their own playground scene, with several children  
doing different activities.  
Kꢀy  
1
2
3
4
5
6
 They then write present continuous sentences about  
their pictures, using the sentences in Exercise 5 as a  
model.  
No, he isn’t. (He’s crawling.)  
Yes, she is.  
No, he isn’t. (He’s hiding.)  
Yes, he is.  
Yes, she is.  
No, he isn’t. (He’s hopping.)  
Writing (page 31)  
Ask the children to look at the photo next to the model  
text. Ask What are they doing? (They’re playing football.)  
Read the text while the children follow it in their books.  
Ask some questions to check understanding, e.g. What  
games does Alex play at school? What is his favourite game?  
Who does Alex play with at home? Do they play Boatman?  
What games do they play in the evening?  
7
Write and or or.  
Ask the children to find examples of sentences containing  
and and or in the model text. (Note that there is only one  
example with or.) Write this sentence on the board: We  
don’t play volleyball or baseball. Ask the children why or has  
been used here, instead of and (because it is a negative  
sentence).  
 The children complete the sentences with and or or.  
Let them check their answers in pairs before checking  
them as a class. Explain the two possible answers for  
sentence 6 (‘and’ if they are played with at the same time, ‘or’  
if they are played with separately).  
Kꢀy  
1
or 2 and 3 and 4 or 5 and 6 and/or  
2
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 7 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
New York in 1900  
 Explain the meaning of even in the sentence There were  
taxis in New York in 1900, and buses and even underground  
trains.  
Lesson objectives  
To understand a magazine article written in the past  
tense  
Note ‘New York’in the text refers to the city, not the state.  
Americans usually call the city New York City, to avoid  
confusion.  
To learn or revise the names of some important  
inventions  
To use the conjunctions (linkers) and, or and but  
The Statue of Liberty was given to the USA by France, as a  
celebration of the friendship between the two countries. It  
represents a woman wearing a crown, holding up a torch  
in her right hand. The statue is 46 metres tall, or 93 metres  
including the pedestal and foundations. Tourists can climb  
up inside the statue and look out through the windows in  
the crown for a fantastic view of the city.  
To write about their town in the past  
Language  
They had (cookers).  
They didn’t have (TVs).  
There wasn’t (an airport).  
There were (candles).  
Comprehension (page 33)  
New vocabulary: electric light, candle, microwave, cooker,  
carriage, underground train  
2
Tick () the things that New york had in 1900.  
Other vocabulary: skyscraper, statue, harbour, phone,  
theatre, cinema, taxi, plane, rocket  
Point to each of the pictures in turn, asking What’s this?  
The children answer It’s a (plane). Make sure they realize  
that the second picture shows an old car and the last  
picture shows an old bus – they are probably different  
from cars and buses that they are familiar with!  
More words: street light, tram, dishwasher, hoover, kettle  
Presentation and pre-reading (page 32)  
Ask the children to open their books at page 32 and to  
look at the photos within the reading text. Ask them (L1) if  
the photos are old or new, and how they know (e.g. they  
are old; we know this because they are in black and white,  
and because the things in them look old).  
•ꢀ The children look back at the text to find out which of the  
things New York had in 1900, and put a tick next to the  
pictures as appropriate.  
Check the answers as a class. Ask individual children to say  
sentences, e.g. They didn’t have planes. They had cars.  
Explain that you are going to read a text about the past.  
Ask the children to scan through the text and find the  
name of a city (New York). Draw the children’s attention  
to the unit title. Say We are going to read about New York in  
nineteen hundred.  
Kꢀy  
The following pictures should be ticked: b (car), c (electric  
light), e (phone), f (horse and carriage), h (bus)  
3
Read and tick () or cross ().  
First teach or revise the vocabulary. Point to the pictures in  
the vocabulary panel and say the words. Model the words  
again for the children and drill pronunciation.  
The children read each sentence and put a tick or a cross  
as appropriate. Encourage them to look back at the text in  
order to find the answers.  
Ask the children to tell you which of the objects we often  
use nowadays, and which are never or rarely used.  
 Check the answers as a class. Ask volunteers to correct  
the false sentences.  
Kꢀy  
Reading (page 32)  
1
1
Read and listen.  
$
08  
2 ✔  
3
4
5
(There wasn’t an airport.)  
(There weren’t any computers or TVs.)  
Play the recording while the children follow the text  
in their books. Then ask some questions to check  
understanding, e.g. How many people lived in New York  
in 1900? Did everyone have electric lights? Were there any  
skyscrapers/phones/cinemas/buses?  
6 ✔  
4
Write There was/were or There wasn’t/weren’t.  
Give the children some brief information about the Statue  
of Liberty (see Note below).  
Let the children work in pairs to complete the exercise,  
making sure they agree on all the answers before they  
write anything.  
Play the recording again, pausing after each thing is  
mentioned. Ask the children to tell you the things that  
New York had in 1900, according to the text: big buildings,  
the Statue of Liberty, electric lights, candles, phones, big  
cookers, theatres, books, horses and carriages, cars, taxis,  
buses, underground trains, boats. See whether the children  
can identify the picture of the old telephone and ask them  
What do you think this is?  
Check the answers as a class.  
Kꢀy  
1
4
There were 2 There were 3 There wasn’t  
There weren’t 5 There were  
1
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 8 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
Ask some questions to check understanding, e.g. What is  
the name of the village? Was it big or small? Did people have  
(cookers)? Was there a theatre/cinema? Were there any cars?  
Vocabulary (page 34)  
5
Find five mistakes in the picture. Write.  
Ask the children to look at the picture in Exercise 5. Explain  
that this is a picture of a house in 1900. Ask the children to  
tell you what things should not have been included in the  
picture. Revise the word rocket if necessary.  
•ꢀ Draw the children’s attention to the list of words at the  
left hand side of the model text. Explain that the child  
who wrote the text started by making this list, but that it  
isn’t complete. Ask the children to look back at the text  
and tell you some things that they could add to the list  
(e.g. cars , planes , telephones , electric lights ,  
candles , cookers , microwaves , TVs , books ).  
The children write each word from the box in the correct  
place, to make the sentences true.  
Kꢀy  
In 1900 they had… books, cookers, candles  
In 1900 they didn’t have… planes, microwaves, rockets,  
computers, TVs  
7
Write and, or or but.  
Ask the children to find examples of sentences containing  
and, or and but in the model text.  
The children complete the sentences with and, or or but.  
Remind the children if necessary that we use but when we  
are contrasting two statements.  
6
Complete the sentences.  
The children complete the text using the appropriate  
words. Remind them if necessary to use the plural forms.  
Explain that they will have to look back at the reading  
text on page 32 to find out how to spell two of the words  
Let them check their answers in pairs before checking  
them as a class.  
(
theatres and cinemas).  
Kꢀy  
Check the answers by asking volunteers to read out  
sentences.  
1
or 2 and 3 but 4 or 5 but 6 and  
8
Find a picture of ꢁour town in the past. Look  
Kꢀy  
and tick () or cross (). Write about it in ꢁour  
1
5
8
microwaves 2 cookers 3 cars 4 (horses and) carriages  
underground trains 6 theatres 7 cinemas  
electric lights 9 candles  
notebook.  
For this activity, you will need copies of an old photo  
of your town. It doesn’t need to be a black and white  
photo, but it should be old enough that it looks definitely  
different to the city now.  
More words (page 47)  
 In a stronger class, use the More words section to extend  
the children’s vocabulary.  
Read the list of words with the children. For each one, ask  
Was there a…? or Were there any…? Tell them to put a tick  
or cross next to each word as appropriate.  
Ask the class to turn to page 47 and look at the pictures  
in the vocabulary panel. Model and drill the new words.  
Then say the words in a different order while the children  
point at the pictures.  
Ask the children to look closely at the photo, and tell you  
more things they could add to the list. Write the list on the  
board, and tick and cross as before.  
Match and write.  
•ꢀ Look at the writing framework with the children. Ask  
volunteers to tell you sentences about the town in the  
past, using the lists and the prompts to help them.  
If necessary, do the first word as an example. Say Look at  
number one. What’s this? Tell the children to look at the  
vocabulary panel and find a word with a double t in it  
•ꢀ When the children are ready, ask them to write a short  
paragraph about the town in the past, using sentences  
like the ones they have been practising.  
(
kettle). They draw a joining line between the picture of  
the kettle and the first word. Then they write the missing  
letters on the dashes to spell out kettle.  
Let the children complete the exercise individually. Check  
the answers as a class.  
Writing (optional extension activity)  
•ꢀ Use this activity to practise There was/were/wasn’t/weren’t.  
Put some familiar classroom objects on a table, e.g. two  
books, three pencils, a bag, a ruler, a pencil sharpener. Ask  
the children to gather round and to look closely at the  
objects. Explain that you are going to remove the objects  
and then they must try to remember what was there. Give  
them a minute or two to look and memorize what they  
see.  
Kꢀy  
1
kettle 2 dishwasher 3 hoover 4 street light 5 tram  
Writing (page 35)  
Ask the children to look at the old photo next to the  
model text. Ask What can you see? (e.g. houses, a road, a  
bike, a person, two cars). Ask the children to look at the  
first sentence of the model text and tell you when the  
photo was taken (1948).  
Remove all the objects and put them out of sight. Write  
the following on the board:  
There was  
Read the text while the children follow it in their books.  
Pause if necessary at the beginning of the second  
paragraph, and explain the meaning of There weren’t many  
cars. Compare with There weren’t any cars and make sure  
the children understand the difference (There weren’t many  
means there were some, but very few).  
There were  
There wasn’t  
There weren’t any  
2
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 8 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
 Ask What was there on the table? and invite the children  
to tell you sentences beginning with the phrases on the  
board, e.g. There was a bag. There were two books. There  
wasn’t a rubber. There weren’t any pens. Don’t write the  
sentences down; do this as an oral activity.  
Put another selection of objects on the table and tell the  
children to commit them to memory as before. Then  
remove the objects.  
The children go back to their desks and write sentences  
about what was on the table.  
When they have finished, ask volunteers to read out  
sentences. The rest of the class listen and decide whether  
or not the sentences are true.  
3
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 8 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
The Aztecs  
they don’t need to read every word; encourage them to  
scan quickly through the text looking for important words.  
Lesson objectives  
To understand a text in the style of a reference book  
Play the recording again.  
To learn or revise vocabulary related to ancient  
civilizations  
Comprehension (page 37)  
To organize information into paragraphs  
To write paragraphs for a school project  
2
Match. Number the pictures.  
The children first match the sentences / sentence halves  
then they match the sentences to the pictures. Let them  
work in pairs to do this, and encourage them to look back  
at the text to help them. Tell them to complete the activity  
orally before they do the matching with a pencil.  
Language  
They didn’t (write words).  
They (used pictures).  
New vocabulary: plant (verb), tools, hunt, sew, beads,  
feathers  
Check the answers as a class. For each one, ask the  
children to tell you the part of the text that told them the  
answer.  
Other vocabulary: wood, stone, palace, fish (verb),  
look after, play (noun), poem, beautiful, ugly, sell,  
flat (noun), fountain  
Kꢀy  
1
c 2 a 3 e 4 b 5 d  
More words: rings, bracelet, necklace, bowl, vase  
The pictures should be numbered in this order, from left to  
right: 5, 1, 4, 3, 2  
Presentation and pre-reading (page 36)  
3
Read and write Yes, they did. or No, they didn’t.  
If your children have studied the Aztecs, ask them to tell  
you in L1 what they know about them. Otherwise, explain  
that the Aztecs were an ancient civilization in Mexico, and  
that you are going to read about them. Check if children  
know where the modern country of Mexico is, looking at  
a map or globe if available.  
Tell the children to ask and answer in pairs, with pencils  
down. They should make sure they agree on all the  
answers. Then let them write their answers down. Explain  
the meaning of ugly if necessary.  
•ꢀ Check the answers as a class. Ask volunteers to ask and  
answer the questions.  
Ask the children to open their books at page 36 and to  
look at the photos within the reading text. Ask them (in  
L1) what they can see. You may need to provide them  
with the word pyramid to describe the stone monument  
pictured.  
Kꢀy  
1
4
Yes, they did. 2 No, they didn’t. 3 Yes, they did.  
No, they didn’t. 5 No, they didn’t. 6 Yes, they did.  
4
Correct one word in each sentence.  
Point to the pictures in the vocabulary panel at the top of  
the page and say the words. Model the words again for  
the children and drill pronunciation.  
•ꢀ For this exercise, the children will need to look carefully  
at the reading text in order to identify the word that is  
wrong. You might like to let them work in pairs.  
Ask the children to tell you which of the words are nouns  
(objects), and which are verbs (actions). Explain that plant  
•ꢀ Check the answers as a class by asking volunteers to read  
is both, but that here it is meant as a verb.  
out the correct sentences.  
Say sentences containing the new vocabulary, and let  
the children point to the pictures, e.g. These beads are  
very colourful. Here are some tools. Look, she’s sewing. He’s  
planting vegetables. I can see four feathers. That man is  
hunting.  
Kꢀy  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
The Aztecs lived in Mexico about 700 years ago.  
They had farms around the city.  
The boys learned to read and write.  
The Aztecs liked songs and plays.  
There were feathers on their hats.  
Girls learned to cook and sew.  
Reading (page 36)  
Children started school when they were fourteen.  
1
Read and listen. $ 09  
Play the recording while the children follow the text  
in their books. Then ask some questions to check  
understanding, e.g. When/Where did the Aztecs live? Were  
the houses made of stone? Did they have farms? Did girls go  
to school? Did the Aztecs have theatres?  
Vocabulary (page 38)  
5
Choose and circle.  
Point to the pictures and explain that they show Aztecs  
doing everyday things. Ask the children to look at the  
first picture. Ask How many men/women/children? Explain  
if necessary that the person who is sitting down is a  
woman. You may also need to explain that Aztec men had  
long hair and wore short white tunics (long shirts).  
Ask the children how many paragraphs the text has got  
(
four). Write the following words on the board: buildings  
and farms, clothes, school, free time. Ask the children to look  
back at the text and to decide in pairs which paragraph  
tells them about which subject on the board. Explain that  
1
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 9 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
 If necessary, teach or revise the words sell and jewellery.  
The children read the texts and circle the correct words.  
You might like to let them do this in pairs.  
7 Read and copꢁ the facts into the topic boxes.  
•ꢀ Explain that Jenny wrote notes to help her write her  
school project. Read the notes in the table, under the  
heading Houses. For each note, ask the children to read  
out the corresponding part of the model text.  
Check the answers as a class by asking volunteers to read  
out the correct sentences.  
Explain that the children are going to organize the rest  
of Jenny’s notes about the Romans into two categories,  
then write paragraphs about them. Tell them to write the  
remaining notes in the correct columns in the table.  
Kꢀy  
1
6
1
women 2 man 3 tools 4 beads 5 selling  
feathers 7 working 8 two 9 sewing 10 hunting  
1 vegetables  
Let them check their answers in pairs before checking  
them as a class.  
6
Choose and write.  
The children work individually to complete the sentences  
using the appropriate words. Encourage them to look  
back at the reading text to help them. Tell them to read  
through the whole exercise before they write anything.  
Kꢀy  
School  
Free time  
girls learned music  
and art  
loved music and dancing  
had theatres in towns  
Let the children check their answers in pairs, then  
check them as a class by asking volunteers to read out  
sentences.  
boys learned maths  
and history  
played ball games and liked  
running  
Kꢀy  
girls learned at  
home  
liked sport too  
1
6
lived 2 planted 3 hunted 4 tools 5 pictures  
amazing 7 sewed 8 feathers  
boys started school  
at 7 years old  
More words (page 48)  
 In a stronger class, use the More words section to extend  
the children’s vocabulary.  
8 Continue Jennꢁ’s project about the Romans.  
Write two more paragraphs with these headings:  
School and Free time.  
•ꢀ The children turn the notes into two short paragraphs.  
Tell them to pay attention to sentences, making sure each  
sentence makes sense, begins with a capital letter and  
ends with a full stop.  
Ask the class to turn to page 48 and look at the pictures in  
the vocabulary panel. Ask the children where we can see  
these objects today (in museums).  
Model and drill the new words. Then say the words in a  
different order while the children point at the pictures.  
Kꢀy  
Example text:  
School  
Read and tick () or cross ().  
The children put a tick or a cross as appropriate.  
Kꢀy  
In Roman times, girls didn’t go to school but they learned at  
home. Boys started school at 7 years old. Girls learned music  
and art, but boys learned maths and history.  
Free time  
The Ancient Romans loved music and dancing and they  
sometimes went to theatres in towns. They liked sport too.  
They played ball games and they liked running.  
1
 2  3  4  5  6 ✔  
Writing (page 39)  
Ask the children to look at the picture next to the model  
text, and talk about it in L1. If they have studied the  
Romans, they may recognize that this is a Roman scene;  
ask them to tell you what they know about the Romans.  
Otherwise, explain that the Romans were another ancient  
civilization, and that at one time they controlled most of  
Europe, and many parts of north Africa and the middle  
east.  
Writing (optional extension activity)  
•ꢀ If the children have studied an ancient civilization (e.g. the  
ancient Egyptians, Aztecs or Romans), help them to write  
some sentences about it in English.  
 Say Let’s find out about the Romans! and read the text while  
•ꢀ Write some headings on the board, e.g. Houses, School,  
Free time, Food, Writing. Look at each heading in turn and  
ask the children what they can tell you about the topic.  
Help them to formulate sentences in English beginning  
with They. Do this orally, but you might want to make  
notes on the board under the appropriate headings.  
the children follow it in their books.  
When you have finished, ask the children what kind of text  
they think it is. Explain that it is part of a school project  
written by a girl called Jenny.  
Ask some questions to check understanding, e.g. Did most  
Romans live in big houses? Did all Romans have bathrooms?  
Draw the children’s attention to the past tense verbs that  
you are using, e.g. lived, studied, ate, used.  
The children use the headings and notes on the board  
to help them to write some sentences about the ancient  
civilization that you have been talking about.  
2
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 9 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
Let’s help the hospital  
Comprehension (page 41)  
Lesson objectives  
To understand an information leaflet  
2 Put the pictures in order.  
To learn or revise vocabulary related to camping  
•ꢀ Explain that the children should put the pictures in  
chronological order – the order in which the events will  
happen, and not necessarily the order in which the things  
are mentioned in the text.  
To be familiar with some phrases commonly used in  
letters  
To write a letter  
Kꢀy  
Language  
1 I’m going to take a sleeping bag and a torch.  
2
3
4
We’re going to sleep in tents.  
After the walk, people are going to give us money.  
We’re going to give toys and books to the hospital.  
We’re going to (collect money).  
I’m going to (take a sleeping bag).  
Are they going to (walk ten miles)?  
Yes, they are./ No, they aren’t.  
3 Match the questions and the answers.  
New vocabulary: campsite, tent, torch, walking boots,  
anorak, water bottle  
•ꢀ Let the children work in pairs to complete the exercise,  
making sure they agree on all the answers before they do  
the matching with a pencil.  
Other vocabulary: sponsored walk, sponsor, charity,  
hospital, collect, boat ride, paintings, swimming pool  
•ꢀ Check the answers as a class.  
More words: path, fence, signpost, map, flask  
Kꢀy  
1
c 2 d 3 e 4 f 5 b 6 a  
Presentation and pre-reading (page 40)  
4
Read and write Yes, they are. and No, they aren’t.  
Ask the children to open their books at page 40 and to  
look at the photos within the reading text. Ask What are  
the children doing? (They are walking/eating/camping).  
Tell the children to ask and answer in pairs, taking turns to  
ask the questions. They then work individually to write the  
short answers.  
Point to the pictures in the vocabulary panel at the top of  
the page and say the words. Model the words again for  
the children and drill pronunciation.  
Check the answers as class, by asking volunteers to ask  
and answer the questions.  
Ask the children to tell you which of the items they can  
see in the photos.  
Kꢀy  
1 Yes, they are. 2 No, they aren’t. 3 Yes, they are.  
4
No, they aren’t. 5 Yes, they are.  
Reading (page 40)  
Vocabulary (page 42)  
1
Read and listen. $ 10  
Play the recording while the children follow the text in  
5 What has Jim got? Complete the list.  
their books.  
•ꢀ Ask the children to look at the pictures and the ticks and  
crosses. Ask a few questions, e.g. Has Jim got walking  
boots/a tent/some chocolate?  
Ask What are the children going to do? Make sure they  
understand what a sponsored walk is. Re-read the  
explanation in the second paragraph, and see Note below.  
•ꢀ The children write all the phrases from the box in the  
appropriate column. Then check the answers as a class.  
Ask more questions to check understanding, e.g. Are the  
teachers going to do the walk? How far are they going to  
walk? What things must they take? What are they going to  
buy with the money?  
•ꢀ Ask What is Jim going to do? Is he going to go camping? Is he  
going to go walking? Prompt the children by telling them  
to look at the things that Jim has and hasn’t got.  
Play the recording again.  
Kꢀy  
Note Sponsored walks are a very common way to raise  
money for charity in Britain. There are very large organized  
walks to raise money for research into various illnesses, such  
as cancer and diabetes, or for charities that help people in  
poverty. People of all ages take part, and there are often  
shorter walks so children can participate – they do not  
usually involve camping as the one in this text does, but take  
a few hours.  
Jim has gꢀꢁ…  
Jim hasn’ꢁ gꢀꢁ…  
some chocolate  
walking boots  
a water bottle  
some sun cream  
a sleeping bag  
an anorak  
a tent  
a torch  
1
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 10 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  
6
Complete the sentences.  
Tell them to write a reply to him, using the useful phrases  
from the box. (Note that they will need to be used in a  
different order.)  
The children work individually to complete the text using  
the appropriate words. Explain that they will have to look  
back at the reading text on page 40 to find two of the  
words (lake and money).  
•ꢀ Before they start, you might like to help them to think of  
ideas by asking individual children Where are you? and  
What are you going to do?  
Check the answers as a class by asking volunteers to read  
out sentences.  
Vocabulary (optional extension activity)  
Kꢀy  
Tell the children to work in pairs to see how many English  
words they can think of that are related to going on  
holiday. Ask them to make a list. You might want to make  
dictionaries available for this task.  
1
tent 2 sleeping bag 3 walking boots 4 lake  
anorak 6 torch 7 chocolate 8 water bottle  
money  
5
9
If you like, the children can use their lists to play a memory  
game in small groups. Demonstrate the game to the class  
first. The first child starts by saying I went on holiday and I  
took (some sun cream). The next child says I went camping  
and I took (some sun cream) and (a suitcase). The game  
continues in this way, with each child adding one more  
item, until someone can’t remember the whole list of  
items. Then the game begins again.  
More words (page 48)  
 In a stronger class, use the More words section to extend  
the children’s vocabulary.  
Ask the class to turn to page 48 and look at the pictures in  
the vocabulary panel. Say the words.  
Model and drill the new words. Then say the words in a  
different order while the children point at the pictures.  
Ask the children when and where they would see or use  
all of these things (on a walk in the countryside).  
Choose and circle.  
The children read the sentences carefully and circle the  
correct word in each one.  
Kꢀy  
1
fence 2 signpost 3 flask 4 map 5 path 6 fence  
Writing (page 43)  
Ask the children to look at the photo next to the model  
text. If the children recognize the Eiffel Tower, ask What’s  
this? and Where is it? Then ask them to look at the reading  
text and tell you what kind of text it is (a letter).  
Read the text while the children follow it in their books.  
Then ask some questions to check understanding, e.g.  
Who wrote the letter? Where is he? What is he going to do  
tonight? How high is the Eiffel Tower? What is he going to do  
tomorrow/on Friday?  
7
Complete the letters.  
Let the children work individually or in pairs to complete  
the letters, with pencils down. Then tell them to write the  
words in the correct places.  
Check the answers as a class by asking volunteers to read  
out the complete letters.  
Tell the children to close their books, and ask them if they  
can remember any of the useful phrases from the letters  
(e.g. Hi Edward, How are you? Please write soon. Dear Jenny,  
Thanks for your email. Take care.).  
Kꢀy  
1
How 2 write 3 Dear 4 Thanks for 5 Take care.  
8
Imagine ꢁou are on holidaꢁ. Write a letter to  
dward in ꢁour notebook.  
Look at the box in Exercise 8 with the children, and see  
if there are any useful phrases here that they haven’t  
mentioned.  
Tell the children to imagine that they are on holiday, and  
that they have just received the above letter from Edward.  
2
Oxford Primary Skills 3 Unit 10 Teaching Notes © Oxford University Press  

Oxford Primary Skills_3 Reading and Writing Key

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